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I'm trying to use the command prompt to move some files, I am used to the linux terminal where I use ~ to specify the my home directory I've looked everywhere but I couldn't seem to find it for windows command prompt (Documents and Settings\[user])

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up vote 47 down vote accepted

You're going to be disappointed: %userprofile%

You can use other terminals, though. Powershell, which I believe you can get on XP and later (and comes preinstalled with Win7), allows you to use ~ for home directory.

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1  
wow lol, that really is disappointing!, is there a way of changing that? – fenerlitk Feb 10 '12 at 14:11
1  
@fenerlitk Not that I'm aware of. You might be interested in AutoHotkey, which is a tool for creating and running scripts and allows for global hotkeys and macros. You could set it up to expand ~ to %userprofile% when typing in the command prompt console window only. I've also noted in an update to the answer that ~ works in other consoles on Windows. – Jay Feb 10 '12 at 14:14
    
SHGetFolderPath – evoskuil Mar 14 '14 at 6:00
    
This comment helped me out of nowhere. Thank you! – Mia Sep 14 '14 at 23:27

You can %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH% for the drive + \docs settings\username or \users\username.

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This answer worked for a service running as local system account. %userprofile% in this case does not. – DonBecker Mar 18 '15 at 23:29

If you want a shorter version of Jay's you could try

    set usr=%userprofile%
    cd %usr%

Or you could even use %u% if you wanted to. It saves some keystrokes anyway.

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