Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This seems like such a simple need but I've spent an inordinate amount of time trying to do this to no avail. I've looked at other questions on SO and I haven't found what I need. I have a very simple JavaScript array such as peoplenames = new Array("Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"); that may or may not contain duplicates and I need to simply remove the duplicates and put the unique values in a new array. That's it. I could point to all the codes that I've tried but I think it's useless because they don't work. If anyone has done this and can help me out I'd really appreciate it. JavaScript or jQuery solutions are both acceptable.

Related: Easiest way to find duplicate values in a JavaScript array

share|improve this question
9  
_.uniq(peoplenames) solves this lodash.com/docs#uniq – Connor Leech Jul 29 '14 at 19:29

36 Answers 36

up vote 224 down vote accepted

Quick and dirty using jQuery:

var names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];
var uniqueNames = [];
$.each(names, function(i, el){
    if($.inArray(el, uniqueNames) === -1) uniqueNames.push(el);
});
share|improve this answer

"Smart" but naïve way

uniqueArray = a.filter(function(item, pos) {
    return a.indexOf(item) == pos;
})

Basically, we iterate over the array and, for each element, check if the first position of this element in the array is equal to the current position. Obviously, these two positions are different for duplicate elements.

Using the 3rd ("this array") parameter of the filter callback we can avoid a closure of the array variable:

uniqueArray = a.filter(function(item, pos, self) {
    return self.indexOf(item) == pos;
})

Although concise, this algorithm is not particularly efficient for large arrays (quadratic time).

Hashtables to the rescue

function uniq(a) {
    var seen = {};
    return a.filter(function(item) {
        return seen.hasOwnProperty(item) ? false : (seen[item] = true);
    });
}

This is how it's usually done. The idea is to place each element in a hashtable and then check for its presence instantly. This gives us linear time, but has at least two drawbacks:

  • since hash keys can only be strings in Javascript, this code doesn't distinguish numbers and "numeric strings". That is, uniq([1,"1"]) will return just [1]
  • for the same reason, all objects will be considered equal: uniq([{foo:1},{foo:2}]) will return just [{foo:1}].

That said, if your arrays contain only primitives and you don't care about types (e.g. it's always numbers), this solution is optimal.

The best from two worlds

An universal solution combines both approaches: it uses hash lookups for primitives and linear search for objects.

function uniq(a) {
    var prims = {"boolean":{}, "number":{}, "string":{}}, objs = [];

    return a.filter(function(item) {
        var type = typeof item;
        if(type in prims)
            return prims[type].hasOwnProperty(item) ? false : (prims[type][item] = true);
        else
            return objs.indexOf(item) >= 0 ? false : objs.push(item);
    });
}

sort | uniq

Another option is to sort the array first, and then remove each element equal to the preceding one:

function uniq(a) {
    return a.sort().filter(function(item, pos, ary) {
        return !pos || item != ary[pos - 1];
    })
}

Again, this doesn't work with objects (because all objects are equal for sort), unless a special compare function can be provided. Additionally, this method silently changes the original array as a side effect - not good! However, if your input is already sorted, this is the way to go (just remove sort from the above).

Unique by...

Sometimes it's desired to uniquify a list based on some criteria other than just equality, for example, to filter out objects that are different, but share some property. This can be done elegantly by passing a callback. This "key" callback is applied to each element, and elements with equal "keys" are removed. Since key is expected to return a primitive, hash table will work fine here:

function uniqBy(a, key) {
    var seen = {};
    return a.filter(function(item) {
        var k = key(item);
        return seen.hasOwnProperty(k) ? false : (seen[k] = true);
    })
}

A particularly useful key() is JSON.stringify which will remove objects that are physically different, but "look" the same:

a = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [1,2,3]]
b = uniqBy(a, JSON.stringify)
console.log(b) // [[1,2,3], [4,5,6]]

Libraries

Both underscore and Lo-Dash provide uniq methods. Their algorithms are basically similar to the first snippet above and boil down to this:

var result = [];
a.forEach(function(item) {
     if(result.indexOf(item) < 0) {
         result.push(item);
     }
});

This is quadratic, but there are nice additional goodies, like wrapping native indexOf, ability to uniqify by a key (iteratee in their parlance), and optimizations for already sorted arrays.

If you're using jQuery and can't stand anything without a dollar before it, it goes like this:

  $.uniqArray = function(a) {
        return $.grep(a, function(item, pos) {
            return $.inArray(item, a) === pos;
        });
  }

which is, again, a variation of the first snippet.

Performance

Function calls are expensive in Javascript, therefore the above solutions, as concise as they are, are not particularly efficient. For maximal performance, replace filter with a loop and get rid of other function calls:

function uniq_fast(a) {
    var seen = {};
    var out = [];
    var len = a.length;
    var j = 0;
    for(var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
         var item = a[i];
         if(seen[item] !== 1) {
               seen[item] = 1;
               out[j++] = item;
         }
    }
    return out;
}

This chunk of ugly code does the same as the snippet #3 above, but an order of magnitude faster:

function uniq(a) {
    var seen = {};
    return a.filter(function(item) {
        return seen.hasOwnProperty(item) ? false : (seen[item] = true);
    });
}

function uniq_fast(a) {
    var seen = {};
    var out = [];
    var len = a.length;
    var j = 0;
    for(var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
         var item = a[i];
         if(seen[item] !== 1) {
               seen[item] = 1;
               out[j++] = item;
         }
    }
    return out;
}

/////

var r = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],
    a = [],
    LEN = 1000,
    LOOPS = 1000;

while(LEN--)
    a = a.concat(r);

var d = new Date();
for(var i = 0; i < LOOPS; i++)
    uniq(a);
document.write('<br>uniq, ms/loop: ' + (new Date() - d)/LOOPS)

var d = new Date();
for(var i = 0; i < LOOPS; i++)
    uniq_fast(a);
document.write('<br>uniq_fast, ms/loop: ' + (new Date() - d)/LOOPS)

ES6

ES6 provides the Set object, which makes things a whole lot easier:

function uniq(a) {
   return Array.from(new Set(a));
}

Note that, unlike in python, ES6 sets are iterated in insertion order, so this code preserves the order of the original array.

However, if you need an array with unique elements, why not use sets right from the beginning?

share|improve this answer
10  
filter and indexOf have been introduced in ECMAScript 5, so this will not work in old IE versions (<9). If you care about those browsers, you will have to use libraries with similar functions (jQuery, underscore.js etc.) – Roman Bataev Feb 10 '12 at 15:26
67  
This is the only answer worth reading. I dont see why we need a 30kb library to solve a 3 line problem. – Roderick Obrist Nov 13 '12 at 6:09
7  
@RoderickObrist you might if you want your page to work in older browsers – Michael Robinson Dec 17 '12 at 2:25
9  
This is O(n^2) solution, which can run very slow in large arrays... – seriyPS Feb 3 '13 at 0:47
5  
Try this array: ["toString", "valueOf", "failed"]. toString and valueOf are stripped completely. Use Object.create(null) instead of {}. – Charles Beattie Jun 16 '14 at 14:02

Got tired of seeing all bad examples with for-loops or jQuery. Javascript has the perfect tools for this nowadays: sort, map and reduce.

Uniq reduce while keeping existing order

var names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];

var uniq = names.reduce(function(a,b){
    if (a.indexOf(b) < 0 ) a.push(b);
    return a;
  },[]);

console.log(uniq, names) // [ 'Mike', 'Matt', 'Nancy', 'Adam', 'Jenny', 'Carl' ]

// one liner
return names.reduce(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(b)<0)a.push(b);return a;},[]);

Faster uniq with sorting

There are probably faster ways but this one is pretty decent.

var uniq = names.slice() // slice makes copy of array before sorting it
  .sort(function(a,b){
    return a > b;
  })
  .reduce(function(a,b){
    if (a.slice(-1)[0] !== b) a.push(b); // slice(-1)[0] means last item in array without removing it (like .pop())
    return a;
  },[]); // this empty array becomes the starting value for a

// one liner
return names.slice().sort(function(a,b){return a > b}).reduce(function(a,b){if (a.slice(-1)[0] !== b) a.push(b);return a;},[]);

Update 2015: ES6 version:

In ES6 you have Sets and Spread which makes it very easy and performant to remove all duplicates:

var uniq = [ ...new Set(names) ]; // [ 'Mike', 'Matt', 'Nancy', 'Adam', 'Jenny', 'Carl' ]

Sort based on occurrence:

Someone asked about ordering the results based on how many unique names there are:

var names = ['Mike', 'Matt', 'Nancy', 'Adam', 'Jenny', 'Nancy', 'Carl']

var uniq = names
  .map((name) => {
    return {count: 1, name: name}
  })
  .reduce((a, b) => {
    a[b.name] = (a[b.name] || 0) + b.count
    return a
  }, {})

var sorted = Object.keys(uniq).sort((a, b) => uniq[a] < uniq[b])

console.log(sorted)
share|improve this answer
3  
This is perfect because unlike filter it actually allows to do some deep manipulation of objects – Necronet Jul 18 '14 at 23:00
3  
This answer deserves more upvotes. Just beautiful, and only Javascript solution as requested by OP! Thank you!! – Mbuso Jul 20 '14 at 12:14
4  
Perfect answer, clean and functional. – amaurs Jul 16 '15 at 1:30
    
Nice! Would it be possible to sort the array based on the frequency of duplicate objects? So that "Nancy" in the above example is moved to the front (or back) of the modified array? – ALx Nov 25 '15 at 13:38
    
@ALx - I updated with an example for sorting based on occurrence. – Christian Landgren Dec 2 '15 at 22:21

Use Underscore.js

It's a library with a host of functions for manipulating arrays.

It's the tie to go along with jQuery's tux, and Backbone.js's suspenders.

_.uniq

_.uniq(array, [isSorted], [iterator]) Alias: unique
Produces a duplicate-free version of the array, using === to test object equality. If you know in advance that the array is sorted, passing true for isSorted will run a much faster algorithm. If you want to compute unique items based on a transformation, pass an iterator function.

Example

var names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];

alert(_.uniq(names, false));

Note: Lo-Dash (an underscore competitor) also offers a comparable .uniq implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately underscore does not provide the ability to define a custom equality function. The callback they do allow is for an 'iteratee' function e.g. with args (item, value, array). – Rene Wooller Nov 17 '14 at 7:02

You can always try putting it into an object, and then iterating through its keys:

function remove_duplicates(arr) {
    var obj = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        obj[arr[i]] = true;
    }
    arr = [];
    for (var key in obj) {
        arr.push(key);
    }
    return arr;
}

Or, for an order-safe version, add it to an object and to a new array, and check to see if you've already added it to that object:

function remove_duplicates_safe(arr) {
    var obj = {};
    var arr2 = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        if (!(arr[i] in obj)) {
            arr2.push(arr[i]);
            obj[arr[i]] = true;
        }
    }
    return arr2;

}

a = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];

b = remove_duplicates(a);
// b:
// ["Adam", "Carl", "Jenny", "Matt", "Mike", "Nancy"]

c = remove_duplicates_safe(a);
// c:
// ["Mike", "Matt", "Nancy", "Adam", "Jenny", "Carl"]
share|improve this answer
2  
In more recent browsers, you could even do var c = Object.keys(b). It should be noted that this approach will only work for strings, but it's alright, that's what the original question was asking for. – amenthes Aug 26 '14 at 8:33
1  
It should also be noted that you may lose the order of the array because objects don't keep their properties in order. – Juan Mendes May 27 '15 at 19:38
1  
@JuanMendes I have created an order-safe version, which simply copies to the new array if the value has not been seen before. – Darthfett Jun 23 '15 at 21:36

A single line version using array filter and indexOf functions:

arr = arr.filter (function (value, index, array) { 
    return array.indexOf (value) == index;
});
share|improve this answer
    
georg's earlier answer included this one. – Mars Mar 28 '15 at 5:26
    
Great way to do it, thanks! – IfTrue May 9 at 2:24
    
care to explain how it eliminates dupes? – web_dev Jun 22 at 4:59
    
@web_dev: it doesn't !! I have corrected a previous edit which broke the code. Hope it makes more sens now. Thanks for asking! – HBP Jun 22 at 7:06

The most concise way to remove duplicates from an array using native javascript functions is to use a sequence like below:

vals.sort().reduce(function(a, b){ if (b != a[0]) a.unshift(b); return a }, [])

there's no need for slice nor indexOf within the reduce function, like i've seen in other examples! it makes sense to use it along with a filter function though:

vals.filter(function(v, i, a){ return i == a.indexOf(v) })

Yet another ES6(2015) way of doing this that already works on a few browsers is:

Array.from(new Set(vals))

or even using the spread operator:

[...new Set(vals)]

cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
Set is great and very intuitive for those used to python. Too bad they do not have those great (union, intersect, difference) methods. – caiohamamura Oct 28 '15 at 1:38
    
I went with the simplistic one line of code that utilizes the set mechanic. This was for a custom automation task so I was not leery of using it in the latest version of Chrome (within jsfiddle). However, I would still like to know the shortest all browser compliant way to de-dupe an array. – Alexander Dixon Jun 10 at 14:07
    
sets are part of the new specification, you should use the sort/reduce combo to assure cross-browser compatibility @AlexanderDixon – Ivo Jun 10 at 14:17
    
.reduce() is not cross-browser compatible as I would have to apply a poly-fill. I appreciate your response though. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Alexander Dixon Jun 10 at 14:56

Here is a simple answer to the question.

var names = ["Alex","Tony","James","Suzane", "Marie", "Laurence", "Alex", "Suzane", "Marie", "Marie", "James", "Tony", "Alex"];
var uniqueNames = [];

    for(var i in names){
        if(uniqueNames.indexOf(names[i]) === -1){
            uniqueNames.push(names[i]);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @al3xAndr3w – madhu Jul 1 '15 at 6:42
    
+1 for === . It wont work for arrays with mixed types if we dont check for it types. Simple but effective answer – San Krish Jan 19 at 16:45

The following is more than 80% faster than the jQuery method listed (see tests below). It is an answer from a similar question a few years ago, if I come across the person who originally proposed it I will post credit. Pure JS.

var temp = {};
  for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
  temp[array[i]] = true;
  var r = [];
  for (var k in temp)
  r.push(k);
  return r;

My Test Case comparison: http://jsperf.com/remove-duplicate-array-tests

share|improve this answer
1  
I add a more fast version in revision 4. Please, review! – seriyPS Feb 3 '13 at 0:46
    
the test didn't seem to be using arrays??? i've added (yet another) one that seems to be consistently fast over different browsers (see jsperf.com/remove-duplicate-array-tests/10) : for (var n = array.length, result = [array[n--]], i; n--;) { i = array[n]; if (!(i in result)) result.push(i); } return result; – imma Aug 9 '13 at 12:58

The top answers have complexity of O(n²), but this can be done with just O(n) by using an object as a hash:

function getDistinctArray(arr) {
    var dups = {};
    return arr.filter(function(el) {
        var hash = el.valueOf();
        var isDup = dups[hash];
        dups[hash] = true;
        return !isDup;
    });
}

This will work for strings, numbers, and dates. If your array contains complex objects (ie, they have to be compared with ===), the above solution won't work. You can get an O(n) implementation for objects by setting a flag on the object itself:

function getDistinctObjArray(arr) {
    var distinctArr = arr.filter(function(el) {
        var isDup = el.inArray;
        el.inArray = true;
        return !isDup;
    });
    distinctArr.forEach(function(el) {
        delete el.inArray;
    });
    return distinctArr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you consider the performance hit in your method? – Tushar Sep 6 '13 at 11:11
    
@Tushar - Where do you see a performance issue? – gilly3 Sep 6 '13 at 15:57
1  
@Tushar - Your gist gives a 404. No sorting algorithm has O(n) complexity. Sorting would not be faster. – gilly3 Sep 9 '13 at 18:41
1  
@Tushar - there are no actual duplicates in that array. If you want to remove objects from an array that have exactly the same properties and values as other objects in the array, you would need to write a custom equality checking function to support it. – gilly3 Sep 10 '13 at 21:58
1  
@Tushar - None of the answers on this page would remove any duplicates from such an array as is in your gist. – gilly3 Sep 10 '13 at 22:12

You could also use the Array.unique() method from the JavaScript Lab library – or steal an idea from there.

However, the code there isn’t very well written, since it declares the unique() method as a property of the Array prototype, thus adding it to every Array, breaking the for...in functionality (because a for...in loop will always iterate over the unique variable, too).

share|improve this answer

In ECMAScript 6 (aka ECMAScript 2015), Set can be used to filter out duplicates. Then it can be converted back to an array using the spread operator.

var names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"],
    unique = [...new Set(names)];
share|improve this answer
    
the constructor of Set actually requires the new keyword – Ivo Jan 8 at 11:49
    
@Ivo Thanks. Previously Firefox's implementation didn't require new, I wonder if the ES6 draft changed about this behavior. – Oriol Jan 8 at 11:52
    
some constructors might be indeed called as functions though this kind of behaviour depends on the browser's implementation of the spec ;) – Ivo Jan 8 at 11:57

Apart from being a simpler, more terse solution than the current answers (minus the future-looking ES6 ones), I perf tested this and it was much faster as well:

var uniqueArray = dupeArray.filter(function(item, i, self){
  return self.lastIndexOf(item) == i;
});

One caveat: Array.lastIndexOf() was added in IE9, so if you need to go lower than that, you'll need to look elsewhere.

share|improve this answer
$(document).ready(function() {

    var arr1=["dog","dog","fish","cat","cat","fish","apple","orange"]

    var arr2=["cat","fish","mango","apple"]

    var uniquevalue=[];
    var seconduniquevalue=[];
    var finalarray=[];

    $.each(arr1,function(key,value){

       if($.inArray (value,uniquevalue) === -1)
       {
           uniquevalue.push(value)

       }

    });

     $.each(arr2,function(key,value){

       if($.inArray (value,seconduniquevalue) === -1)
       {
           seconduniquevalue.push(value)

       }

    });

    $.each(uniquevalue,function(ikey,ivalue){

        $.each(seconduniquevalue,function(ukey,uvalue){

            if( ivalue == uvalue)

            {
                finalarray.push(ivalue);
            }   

        });

    });
    alert(finalarray);
});
share|improve this answer

I had done a detailed comparison of dupes removal at some other question but having noticed that this is the real place i just wanted to share it here as well.

I believe this is the best way to do this

var myArray = [100, 200, 100, 200, 100, 100, 200, 200, 200, 200],
    reduced = Object.keys(myArray.reduce((p,c) => (p[c] = true,p),{}));
console.log(reduced);

OK .. even though this one is O(n) and the others are O(n^2) i was curious to see benchmark comparison between this reduce / look up table and filter/indexOf combo (I choose Jeetendras very nice implementation http://stackoverflow.com/a/37441144/4543207). I prepare a 100K item array filled with random positive integers in range 0-9999 and and it removes the duplicates. I repeat the test for 10 times and the average of the results show that they are no match in performance.

  • In firefox v47 reduce & lut : 14.85ms vs filter & indexOf : 2836ms
  • In chrome v51 reduce & lut : 23.90ms vs filter & indexOf : 1066ms

Well ok so far so good. But let's do it properly this time in the ES6 style. It looks so cool..! But as of now how it will perform against the powerful lut solution is a mystery to me. Lets first see the code and then benchmark it.

var myArray = [100, 200, 100, 200, 100, 100, 200, 200, 200, 200],
    reduced = [...myArray.reduce((p,c) => p.set(c,true),new Map()).keys()];
console.log(reduced);

Wow that was short..! But how about the performance..? It's beautiful... Since the heavy weight of the filter / indexOf lifted over our shoulders now i can test an array 1M random items of positive integers in range 0..99999 to get an average from 10 consecutive tests. I can say this time it's a real match. See the result for yourself :)

var ranar = [],
     red1 = a => Object.keys(a.reduce((p,c) => (p[c] = true,p),{})),
     red2 = a => reduced = [...a.reduce((p,c) => p.set(c,true),new Map()).keys()],
     avg1 = [],
     avg2 = [],
       ts = 0,
       te = 0,
     res1 = [],
     res2 = [],
     count= 10;
for (var i = 0; i<count; i++){
  ranar = (new Array(1000000).fill(true)).map(e => Math.floor(Math.random()*100000));
  ts = performance.now();
  res1 = red1(ranar);
  te = performance.now();
  avg1.push(te-ts);
  ts = performance.now();
  res2 = red2(ranar);
  te = performance.now();
  avg2.push(te-ts);
}

avg1 = avg1.reduce((p,c) => p+c)/count;
avg2 = avg2.reduce((p,c) => p+c)/count;

console.log("reduce & lut took: " + avg1 + "msec");
console.log("map & spread took: " + avg2 + "msec");

Which one would you use..? Well not so fast...! Don't be deceived. Map is at displacement. Now look... in all of the above cases we fill an array of size n with numbers of range < n. I mean we have an array of size 100 and we fill with random numbers 0..9 so there are definite duplicates and "almost" definitely each number has a duplicate. How about if we fill the array in size 100 with random numbers 0..9999. Let's now see Map playing at home. This time an Array of 100K items but random number range is 0..100M. We will do 100 consecutive tests to average the results. OK let's see the bets..! <- no typo

var ranar = [],
     red1 = a => Object.keys(a.reduce((p,c) => (p[c] = true,p),{})),
     red2 = a => reduced = [...a.reduce((p,c) => p.set(c,true),new Map()).keys()],
     avg1 = [],
     avg2 = [],
       ts = 0,
       te = 0,
     res1 = [],
     res2 = [],
     count= 100;
for (var i = 0; i<count; i++){
  ranar = (new Array(100000).fill(true)).map(e => Math.floor(Math.random()*100000000));
  ts = performance.now();
  res1 = red1(ranar);
  te = performance.now();
  avg1.push(te-ts);
  ts = performance.now();
  res2 = red2(ranar);
  te = performance.now();
  avg2.push(te-ts);
}

avg1 = avg1.reduce((p,c) => p+c)/count;
avg2 = avg2.reduce((p,c) => p+c)/count;

console.log("reduce & lut took: " + avg1 + "msec");
console.log("map & spread took: " + avg2 + "msec");

Now this is the spectacular comeback of Map()..! May be now you can make a better decision when you want to remove the dupes.

Well ok we are all happy now. But the lead role always comes last with some applause. I am sure some of you wonder what Set object would do. Now that since we are open to ES6 and we know Map is the winner of the previous games let us compare Map with Set as a final. A typical Real Madrid vs Barcelona game this time... or is it? Let's see who will win the el classico :)

var ranar = [],
     red1 = a => reduced = [...a.reduce((p,c) => p.set(c,true),new Map()).keys()],
     red2 = a => Array.from(new Set(a)),
     avg1 = [],
     avg2 = [],
       ts = 0,
       te = 0,
     res1 = [],
     res2 = [],
     count= 100;
for (var i = 0; i<count; i++){
  ranar = (new Array(100000).fill(true)).map(e => Math.floor(Math.random()*10000000));
  ts = performance.now();
  res1 = red1(ranar);
  te = performance.now();
  avg1.push(te-ts);
  ts = performance.now();
  res2 = red2(ranar);
  te = performance.now();
  avg2.push(te-ts);
}

avg1 = avg1.reduce((p,c) => p+c)/count;
avg2 = avg2.reduce((p,c) => p+c)/count;

console.log("map & spread took: " + avg1 + "msec");
console.log("set & A.from took: " + avg2 + "msec");

Wow.. man..! Well unexpectedly it didn't turn out to be an el classico at all. More like Barcelona FC against CA Osasuna :))

share|improve this answer

A slight modification of thg435's excellent answer to use a custom comparator:

function contains(array,obj) {
    for(var i =0;i<array.length;i++) {
        if(isEqual(array[i],obj))return true;
    }
    return false;
}
//comparator
function isEqual(obj1,obj2) {
    if(obj1.name==obj2.name) return true;
    return false;
}
function removeDuplicates(ary) {
    var arr = [];
    return ary.filter(function(x) {
        return !contains(arr,x) && arr.push(x);
    });
}
share|improve this answer

This is probably one of the fastest way to remove permanently the duplicates from an array 10x times faster than the most functions here.& 78x faster in safari

function toUnique(a,b,c){               //array,placeholder,placeholder
 b=a.length;while(c=--b)while(c--)a[b]!==a[c]||a.splice(c,1)
}
  1. Test: http://jsperf.com/wgu
  2. Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/46S7g/
  3. More: http://stackoverflow.com/a/25082874/2450730

if you can't read the code above ask, read a javascript book or here are some explainations about shorter code. http://stackoverflow.com/a/21353032/2450730

share|improve this answer
    
explain downvote pls... – cocco Aug 11 '14 at 23:09
5  
I'd guess its due to posting minified code as a solution... – Mark K Cowan Nov 6 '14 at 12:26
    
You would deserve a downvote for claiming to be "fastest" when using while within while and splice (which is a loop too). The fastest way uses a hash-map (JS-Object) and a single loop and is O(n). Try to write the function only using hasOwnProperty(), push() and forEach() and it will be fast. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_O_notation – cat Jul 26 '15 at 10:17
    
From tests i made and read on many other sites ... direct setting is faster than push (x[0] vs x.push()), forEach is much slower then while & hasOwnProperty() is useless if you don't mess up your array. but i would be happy if you post a code which is faster . You can also downvote. anyway i wrote the function in many different ways , and even if i find it also strange that this one works, this one gave the best results in most browsers on normal arrays. – cocco Jul 26 '15 at 14:18
    
by normal arrays i mean in the range of 10-100000 elements. Note... again i would be really happy to find a better way as i'm using this function and i'm also someone who tries to avoi useless loops. check out my other functions. – cocco Jul 26 '15 at 14:24

Another method of doing this without writing much code is using the ES5 Object.keys-method:

var arrayWithDuplicates = ['a','b','c','d','a','c'],
    deduper = {};
arrayWithDuplicates.forEach(function (item) {
    deduper[item] = null;
});
var dedupedArray = Object.keys(deduper); // ["a", "b", "c", "d"]

Extracted in a function

function removeDuplicates (arr) {
    var deduper = {}
    arr.forEach(function (item) {
        deduper[item] = null;
    });
    return Object.keys(deduper);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work. You aren't using arrayWithDuplicates anywhere. – Oriol Dec 10 '14 at 15:51
    
@Oriol Sorry about that, I forgot one line. I edited the example. – Willem de Wit Dec 11 '14 at 9:58

go for this one ,

var uniqueArray = duplicateArray.filter(function(elem, pos) {
                        return duplicateArray.indexOf(elem) == pos;
                      }); 

Now uniqueArray contains no duplicates

share|improve this answer

Best method is using Underscore.js, it needs to do just one step. i.e _.uniq(list) . it will return list with uniq data.

share|improve this answer

If by any chance you were using

D3.js

You could do

d3.set(["foo", "bar", "foo", "baz"]).values() ==> ["foo", "bar", "baz"]

https://github.com/mbostock/d3/wiki/Arrays#set_values

share|improve this answer

Nested loop method for removing duplicates in array and preserving original order of elements.

var array = [1, 3, 2, 1, [5], 2, [4]]; // INPUT

var element = 0;
var decrement = array.length - 1;
while(element < array.length) {
  while(element < decrement) {
    if (array[element] === array[decrement]) {
      array.splice(decrement, 1);
      decrement--;
    } else {
      decrement--;
    }
  }
  decrement = array.length - 1;
  element++;
}

console.log(array);// [1, 3, 2, [5], [4]]

Explanation: Inner loop compares first element of array with all other elements starting with element at highest index. Decrementing towards the first element a duplicate is spliced from the array.

When inner loop is finished the outer loop increments to the next element for comparison and resets the new length of the array.

share|improve this answer

https://jsfiddle.net/2w0k5tz8/

function remove_duplicates(array_){
    var ret_array = new Array();
    for (var a = array_.length - 1; a >= 0; a--) {
        for (var b = array_.length - 1; b >= 0; b--) {
            if(array_[a] == array_[b] && a != b){
                delete array_[b];
            }
        };
        if(array_[a] != undefined)
            ret_array.push(array_[a]);
    };
    return ret_array;
}

console.log(remove_duplicates(Array(1,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,3)));

Loop through, remove duplicates, and create a clone array place holder because the array index will not be updated.

Loop backward for better performance ( your loop wont need to keep checking the length of your array)

share|improve this answer
function arrayDuplicateRemove(arr){
    var c = 0;
    var tempArray = [];
    console.log(arr);
    arr.sort();
    console.log(arr);
    for (var i = arr.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if(arr[i] != tempArray[c-1]){
            tempArray.push(arr[i])
            c++;
        }
    };
    console.log(tempArray);
    tempArray.sort();
    console.log(tempArray);
}
share|improve this answer

This was just another solution but different than the rest.

function diffArray(arr1, arr2) {
  var newArr = arr1.concat(arr2);
  newArr.sort();
  var finalArr = [];
  for(var i = 0;i<newArr.length;i++) {
   if(!(newArr[i] === newArr[i+1] || newArr[i] === newArr[i-1])) {
     finalArr.push(newArr[i]);
   } 
  }
  return finalArr;
}
share|improve this answer

Here is another approach using jQuery,

function uniqueArray(array){
  if ($.isArray(array)){
    var dupes = {}; var len, i;
    for (i=0,len=array.length;i<len;i++){
      var test = array[i].toString();
      if (dupes[test]) { array.splice(i,1); len--; i--; } else { dupes[test] = true; }
    }
  } 
  else {
    if (window.console) console.log('Not passing an array to uniqueArray, returning whatever you sent it - not filtered!');
      return(array);
  }
  return(array);
}

Author: William Skidmore

share|improve this answer
function removeDuplicates(inputArray) {
            var outputArray=new Array();

            if(inputArray.length>0){
                jQuery.each(inputArray, function(index, value) {
                    if(jQuery.inArray(value, outputArray) == -1){
                        outputArray.push(value);
                    }
                });
            }           
            return outputArray;
        }
share|improve this answer

If you don't want to include a whole library, you can use this one off to add a method that any array can use:

Array.prototype.uniq = function uniq() {
  return this.reduce(function(accum, cur) { 
    if (accum.indexOf(cur) === -1) accum.push(cur); 
    return accum; 
  }, [] );
}

["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"].uniq()
share|improve this answer

If you're creating the array yourself, you can save yourself a loop and the extra unique filter by doing the check as you're inserting the data;

var values = [];
$.each(collection, function() {
    var x = $(this).value;
    if (!$.inArray(x, values)) {
        values.push(x);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Be careful with using the jQuery inArray method: it returns the index of the element in array, not a boolean value. Check the documentation: jQuery.inArray() – xonya Apr 24 '15 at 8:52

The easiest way to remove string duplicates is to use associative array and then iterate over the associative array to make the list/array back.

Like below:

var toHash = [];
var toList = [];

// add from ur data list to hash
$(data.pointsToList).each(function(index, Element) {
    toHash[Element.nameTo]= Element.nameTo;
});

// now convert hash to array
// don't forget the "hasownproperty" else u will get random results 
for (var key in toHash)  {
    if (toHash.hasOwnProperty(key)) { 
      toList.push(toHash[key]);
   }
}

Voila, now duplicates are gone!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.