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This seems like such a simple need but I've spent an inordinate amount of time trying to do this to no avail. I've looked at other questions on SO and I haven't found what I need. I have a very simple JavaScript array such as peoplenames = new Array("Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"); that may or may not contain duplicates and I need to simply remove the duplicates and put the unique values in a new array. That's it. I could point to all the codes that I've tried but I think it's useless because they don't work. If anyone has done this and can help me out I'd really appreciate it. JavaScript or jQuery solutions are both acceptable.

Related: Easiest way to find duplicate values in a JavaScript array

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I'm not a javascript programmer, but couldn't you just sort the array with a lexical comparator: javascriptkit.com/javatutors/arraysort.shtml and then loop through checking if each element is the same as the next and if so, removing it? –  Benj Feb 10 '12 at 14:58
    
an advice, to create new array : peoplenames = ["Mike",...]; –  mgraph Feb 10 '12 at 15:01
1  
2  
how ironic that this question itself is a duplicate of another question –  geoff Apr 26 at 6:48

15 Answers 15

up vote 107 down vote accepted

Quick and dirty using jQuery:

var names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];
var uniqueNames = [];
$.each(names, function(i, el){
    if($.inArray(el, uniqueNames) === -1) uniqueNames.push(el);
});
share|improve this answer
1  
this is clean and simple and has better cross-browser support –  kramden88 Feb 16 '12 at 16:22
2  
Works great. In case anyone has my issue... a mix of strings and numbers are not matched. So ["1", 1, 2, 3, "3"] will not work. Obviously. –  Mulhoon Nov 21 '12 at 13:08
    
In that case, just make sure you "feed" the array only integers or numbers. parseInt() and toString() come to mind. ;-) –  Ace Apr 3 '13 at 15:24

Less code than you might think.

uniqueArray = myArray.filter(function(elem, pos) {
    return myArray.indexOf(elem) == pos;
})

or, using the 3rd ("this array") parameter of the filter callback:

uniqueArray = myArray.filter(function(elem, pos, self) {
    return self.indexOf(elem) == pos;
})

A word of warning: filter and indexOf are (relatively) recent additions to Javascript and don't work in ancient browsers. See here for details.

A more realistic version that tries to use hash lookups when possible:

uniq = function(ary) {
    var prim = {"boolean":{}, "number":{}, "string":{}}, obj = [];

    return ary.filter(function(x) {
        var t = typeof x;
        return (t in prim) ? 
            !prim[t][x] && (prim[t][x] = 1) :
            obj.indexOf(x) < 0 && obj.push(x);
    });
}

a = ["a", null, 12, window, window.undef1, "b", window, 12, "12", window.undef2, null]
console.log(uniq(a)) // ["a", null, 12, DOMWindow, undefined, "b", "12"]

This will be linear for arrays of primitives, but still quadratic for objects.

While above code is based on strict comparison (===, indexOf), the following variant uses a custom key function, which is supposed to get an array element and return its comparison key as a string:

uniqBy = function(ary, key) {
    var seen = {};
    return ary.filter(function(elem) {
        var k = key(elem);
        return (seen[k] === 1) ? 0 : seen[k] = 1;
    })
}

This is particularly useful when comparing objects that are different but "look" the same:

a = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[1,2,3]]
b = uniqBy(a, JSON.stringify)
console.log(b) // [[1,2,3],[4,5,6]]
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13  
wow very elegant –  kramden88 Feb 10 '12 at 15:09
8  
filter and indexOf have been introduced in ECMAScript 5, so this will not work in old IE versions (<9). If you care about those browsers, you will have to use libraries with similar functions (jQuery, underscore.js etc.) –  Roman Bataev Feb 10 '12 at 15:26
5  
This is the only answer worth reading. I dont see why we need a 30kb library to solve a 3 line problem. –  Roderick Obrist Nov 13 '12 at 6:09
3  
@RoderickObrist you might if you want your page to work in older browsers –  Michael Robinson Dec 17 '12 at 2:25
8  
This is O(n^2) solution, which can run very slow in large arrays... –  seriyPS Feb 3 '13 at 0:47

Use Underscore.js

It's a library with a host of functions for manipulating arrays.

It's the tie to go along with jQuery's tux, and Backbone.js's suspenders.

_.uniq

_.uniq(array, [isSorted], [iterator]) Alias: unique
Produces a duplicate-free version of the array, using === to test object equality. If you know in advance that the array is sorted, passing true for isSorted will run a much faster algorithm. If you want to compute unique items based on a transformation, pass an iterator function.

Example

var names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];

alert(_.uniq(names, false));

Note: Lo-Dash (an underscore competitor) also offers a comparable .uniq implementation.

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Got tired of seeing all bad examples with for-loops or jQuery. Javascript has the perfect tools for this nowadays: sort, map and reduce.

Uniq reduce while keeping existing order

var names = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];

var uniq = names.reduce(function(a,b){
    if (a.indexOf(b) < 0 ) a.push(b);
    return a;
  },[]);

console.log(uniq, names) // [ 'Mike', 'Matt', 'Nancy', 'Adam', 'Jenny', 'Carl' ]

// one liner
return names.reduce(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(b)<0)a.push(b);return a;},[]);

Faster uniq with sorting

There are probably faster ways but this one is pretty decent.

var uniq = names.slice() // slice makes copy of array before sorting it
  .sort(function(a,b){
    return a - b;
  })
  .reduce(function(a,b){
    if (a.slice(-1)[0] !== b) a.push(b); // slice(-1)[0] means last item in array without removing it (like .pop())
    return a;
  },[]); // this empty array becomes the starting value for a

// one liner
return names.slice().sort(function(a,b){return a - b}).reduce(function(a,b){if (a.slice(-1)[0] !== b) a.push(b);return a;},[]);
share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect because unlike filter it actually allows to do some deep manipulation of objects –  Necronet Jul 18 at 23:00
    
This answer deserves more upvotes. Just beautiful, and only Javascript solution as requested by OP! Thank you!! –  Mbuso Jul 20 at 12:14

You can always try putting it into an object, and then iterating through its keys:

a = ["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"];
b = {};
for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
    b[a[i]] = a[i];
}
c = [];
for (var key in b) {
    c.push(key);
}
//c:
//["Mike", "Matt", "Nancy", "Adam", "Jenny", "Carl"]
share|improve this answer

The top answers have complexity of O(n²), but this can be done with just O(n) by using an object as a hash:

function getDistinctArray(arr) {
    var dups = {};
    return arr.filter(function(el) {
        var hash = el.valueOf();
        var isDup = dups[hash];
        dups[hash] = true;
        return !isDup;
    });
}

This will work for strings, numbers, and dates. If your array contains complex objects (ie, they have to be compared with ===), the above solution won't work. You can get an O(n) implementation for objects by setting a flag on the object itself:

function getDistinctObjArray(arr) {
    var distinctArr = arr.filter(function(el) {
        var isDup = el.inArray;
        el.inArray = true;
        return !isDup;
    });
    distinctArr.forEach(function(el) {
        delete el.inArray;
    });
    return distinctArr;
}
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Did you consider the performance hit in your method? –  Tushar Sep 6 '13 at 11:11
    
@Tushar - Where do you see a performance issue? –  gilly3 Sep 6 '13 at 15:57
1  
@Tushar - Your gist gives a 404. No sorting algorithm has O(n) complexity. Sorting would not be faster. –  gilly3 Sep 9 '13 at 18:41
1  
@Tushar - there are no actual duplicates in that array. If you want to remove objects from an array that have exactly the same properties and values as other objects in the array, you would need to write a custom equality checking function to support it. –  gilly3 Sep 10 '13 at 21:58
1  
@Tushar - None of the answers on this page would remove any duplicates from such an array as is in your gist. –  gilly3 Sep 10 '13 at 22:12

A single line version using array filter and indexOf functions:

arr = arr.filter (function (v, i, a) { return a.indexOf (v) == i });
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The following is more than 80% faster than the jQuery method listed (see tests below). It is an answer from a similar question a few years ago, if I come across the person who originally proposed it I will post credit. Pure JS.

var temp = {};
  for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
  temp[array[i]] = true;
  var r = [];
  for (var k in temp)
  r.push(k);
  return r;

My Test Case comparison: http://jsperf.com/remove-duplicate-array-tests

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1  
I add a more fast version in revision 4. Please, review! –  seriyPS Feb 3 '13 at 0:46
    
Works great. Thanks. –  gleapman May 9 '13 at 22:32
    
the test didn't seem to be using arrays??? i've added (yet another) one that seems to be consistently fast over different browsers (see jsperf.com/remove-duplicate-array-tests/10) : for (var n = array.length, result = [array[n--]], i; n--;) { i = array[n]; if (!(i in result)) result.push(i); } return result; –  imma Aug 9 '13 at 12:58
    
Thanks for your contributions! –  Levi Sep 5 '13 at 12:39

You could also use the Array.unique() method from the JavaScript Lab library – or steal an idea from there.

However, the code there isn’t very well written, since it declares the unique() method as a property of the Array prototype, thus adding it to every Array, breaking the for...in functionality (because a for...in loop will always iterate over the unique variable, too).

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A slight modification of thg435's excellent answer to use a custom comparator:

function contains(array,obj) {
    for(var i =0;i<array.length;i++) {
        if(isEqual(array[i],obj))return true;
    }
    return false;
}
//comparator
function isEqual(obj1,obj2) {
    if(obj1.name==obj2.name) return true;
    return false;
}
function removeDuplicates(ary) {
    var arr = [];
    return ary.filter(function(x) {
        return !contains(arr,x) && arr.push(x);
    });
}
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$(document).ready(function() {

    var arr1=["dog","dog","fish","cat","cat","fish","apple","orange"]

    var arr2=["cat","fish","mango","apple"]

    var uniquevalue=[];
    var seconduniquevalue=[];
    var finalarray=[];

    $.each(arr1,function(key,value){

       if($.inArray (value,uniquevalue) === -1)
       {
           uniquevalue.push(value)

       }

    });

     $.each(arr2,function(key,value){

       if($.inArray (value,seconduniquevalue) === -1)
       {
           seconduniquevalue.push(value)

       }

    });

    $.each(uniquevalue,function(ikey,ivalue){

        $.each(seconduniquevalue,function(ukey,uvalue){

            if( ivalue == uvalue)

            {
                finalarray.push(ivalue);
            }   

        });

    });
    alert(finalarray);
});
share|improve this answer

Here is another approach using jQuery,

function uniqueArray(array){
  if ($.isArray(array)){
    var dupes = {}; var len, i;
    for (i=0,len=array.length;i<len;i++){
      var test = array[i].toString();
      if (dupes[test]) { array.splice(i,1); len--; i--; } else { dupes[test] = true; }
    }
  } 
  else {
    if (window.console) console.log('Not passing an array to uniqueArray, returning whatever you sent it - not filtered!');
      return(array);
  }
  return(array);
}

Author: William Skidmore

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function removeDuplicates(inputArray) {
            var outputArray=new Array();

            if(inputArray.length>0){
                jQuery.each(inputArray, function(index, value) {
                    if(jQuery.inArray(value, outputArray) == -1){
                        outputArray.push(value);
                    }
                });
            }           
            return outputArray;
        }
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If you don't want to include a whole library, you can use this one off to add a method that any array can use:

Array.prototype.uniq = function uniq() {
  return this.reduce(function(accum, cur) { 
    if (accum.indexOf(cur) === -1) accum.push(cur); 
    return accum; 
  }, [] );
}

["Mike","Matt","Nancy","Adam","Jenny","Nancy","Carl"].uniq()
share|improve this answer

If you're creating the array yourself, you can save yourself a loop and the extra unique filter by doing the check as you're inserting the data;

var values = [];
$.each(collection, function() {
    var x = $(this).value;
    if (!$.inArray(x, values)) {
        values.push(x);
    }
});
share|improve this answer

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