Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
// function scoreHandArray scores your hand
function scoreHandArray(hand) {
    var score = 0;
    for (i=0,i<hand.length,i++) {
        score = score + hand[i].value;
    };
    return score;
};

console.log( "You have the " + player[0].face + " of " + player[0].suit " and the " + player[1].face " of " + player[1].suit " for a score of " scoreHandArray(player));

Hello, it's me again! This function here has an error in it that I cannot find, returning SyntaxError: Expected ';'. (I know it is the function, because commenting out the console.log changes nothing.) Function scoreHandArray takes an array of objects and returns the score of the objects. Full source code here:

// This code defines the Object constructor Card, used to make the card objects
var Card = function(card) {
    this.face = theFace(card);
    this.suit = theSuit(card);
    this.value = theValue(card);
};

// This code creates the Deck to be used.
var deck = [];
for ( i=0 ; i<52 ; i++ ) {
    deck.push( i );
};
for ( i=51 ; i>0 ; i-- ) {
    var random = Math.floor(Math.random()*i);
    var temp = deck[random];
    deck[random] = deck[i];
    deck[i] = temp;
};
// 0-12 is Spades.
// 13-25 is Hearts.
// 26-38 is Clubs.
// 39-51 is Diamonds.

// Now we create the hand of the player and dealer
var player = [];
var dealer = [];

// Now to deal a card to player
player.push(deck.pop());
dealer.push(deck.pop());

// and another
player.push(deck.pop());
dealer.push(deck.pop());

// function theFace gives the face of a card
function theFace( card ) {
    var faces = ["King","Ace","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","10","Queen","Jack"];
    return(faces[card%13]);
};

// function theValue uses 'switch' to determine points from a card
function theValue(card) {
    var value = card % 13;
    switch( value ) {

        case(0):
        case(11):
        case(12):
            value = 10;
            break;

        case(1):
            value = 11;
            break;

        default:
            value = value;
            break;

    };
    return value;
};

// function theSuit returns the suit of a card
function theSuit(card) {
    var suit;
    if(card>38) {
        suit = "Diamonds";
    }else if(card>25) {
        suit = "Clubs";
    }else if(card>12) {
        suit = "Hearts";
    }else {
        suit = "Spades";
    };
    return suit;
};

// function toObject the first (numbered) card of of a hand 
// and turns it into an Object with the desired properties
function toObject( hand ) {
    var card = hand.pop();
    if (typeof(card) !== "number") {
        hand.push(card);
    } else {
        var card = new Card (card);
        hand.unshift(card);
    };
    return hand;
};

toObject(player);
toObject(player);
toObject(dealer);
toObject(dealer);

// function scoreHandArray scores your hand
function scoreHandArray(hand) {
    var score = 0;
    for (i=0,i<hand.length,i++) {
        score = score + hand[i].value;
    };
    return score;
};

console.log( "You have the " + player[0].face + " of " + player[0].suit " and the " + player[1].face " of " + player[1].suit " for a score of " scoreHandArray(player));

Strange, now after replacing the ,s in the for loop with ;s, it now responds ReferenceError: expected ')'. What ) could it want? (The error appears to be in the last console.log line, as commenting it out makes the error dissapear.) I counted, in that line I have 2 ( and 2 )!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like your problem is here:

for (i=0,i<hand.length,i++) {
    score = score + hand[i].value;
};

You need to replace the commas in the for loop with ;. Also, The semicolon after the } isn't necessary.

Additionally, using var i=0 at the beginning of the loop is preferred, and also prevents scoping issues due to referencing the global i variable.

share|improve this answer
    
aww, come on! I thought I had checked that! Thanks! –  CAD97 Feb 10 '12 at 16:51
    
You're welcome. Check out JSLint (posted by Mike_K) as well, it's quite helpful. –  davethegr8 Feb 10 '12 at 16:54

Your best bet would to put ALL of your JavaScript code in JSLint. this will help you clean up whatever syntax issues may be cascading into a problem, and help big time for cross browser compatibility.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.