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I was refactoring some code earlier and I came across an implementation of an iterator block I wasn't too sure about. In an integration layer of a system where the client is calling an extrernal API for some data I have a set of translators that take the data returned from the API and translate it into collections of business entities used in the logic layer. A common translator class will look like this:

// translate a collection of entities coming back from an extrernal source into business entities
public static IEnumerable<MyBusinessEnt> Translate(IEnumerable<My3rdPartyEnt> ents) {

    // for each 3rd party ent, create business ent and return collection
    return from ent in ents
           select new MyBusinessEnt {
               Id = ent.Id,
               Code = ent.Code
           };
}

Today I came across the following code. Again, it's a translator class, it's purpose is to translate the collection in the parameter into the method return type. However, this time it's an iterator block:

// same implementation of a translator but as an iterator block
public static IEnumerable<MyBusinessEnt> Translate(IEnumerable<My3rdPartyEnt> ents) {
    foreach(var ent in ents)
    {
        yield return new MyBusinessEnt {
            Id = ent.Id,
            Code = ent.Code
        };
    }
}

My question is: is this a valid use of an iterator block? I can't see the benefit of creating a translator class in this way. Could this result in some unexpected behaviour?

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Seems perfectly valid to me- it provides compile-safe translation between two entities. Whats the problem with it? –  Chris Shain Feb 10 '12 at 17:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Your two samples do pretty much exactly the same thing. The query version will be rewritten into a call to Select, and Select is written exactly like your second example; it iterates over each element in the source collection and yield-returns a transformed element.

This is a perfectly valid use of an iterator block, though of course it is no longer necessary to write your own iterator blocks like this because you can just use Select.

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brilliant - thanks for the clarification. –  james lewis Feb 10 '12 at 17:37

Yes, that's valid. The foreach has the advantage of being debuggable,so I tend to prefer that design.

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So the iterator block could cause some confusion to anyone trying to debug a foreach over this collection of business entities later on in the system? –  james lewis Feb 10 '12 at 17:09
    
I don't think that there's necessarily any confusion; the foreach block simply makes it easier to target line items that are being translated. This allows for more simple debugging if the translation ever becomes more than trivial. Both are perfectly find implementations though. –  eouw0o83hf Feb 10 '12 at 17:11

The first example is not an iterator. It just creates and returns an IEnumerable<MyBusinessEnt>.

The second is an iterator and I don't see anything wrong with it. Each time the caller iterates over the return value of that method, the yield will return a new element.

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Yes, that works fine, and the result is very similar.

Both creates an object that is capable of returning the result. Both rely on the source enumerable to remain intact until the result is completed (or cut short). Both uses deferred execution, i.e. the objects are created one at a time when you iterate the result.

There is a difference in that the first returns an expression that uses library methods to produce an enumerator, while the second creates a custom enumerator.

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OK, but there's no need to create a custom iterator in this example right? As @Aliostad pointed out, iterator blocks are best used with a conditional. So perhaps the second method is slightly less readable \ debuggable and therefore maybe the first approach would be better suited to this scenario. –  james lewis Feb 10 '12 at 17:16
    
ALso the difference is that the custom enumerator runs immediately while first one (select this from that) running is delayed. –  Aliostad Feb 10 '12 at 17:19
    
@Aliostad - that, I don't quite understand... so the 1st example returns a collection that hasn't been enumerated yet. The second one is enumerating the return collection each time it is called? Is that correct? –  james lewis Feb 10 '12 at 17:21
    
@jameslewis: LINQ handles conditionals just fine. That's what where is for. –  Brian Feb 10 '12 at 17:23
    
@Aliostad: The second one starts immediately, but it only produces the first item. It doesn't run throught the rest of the items until you consume it. –  Guffa Feb 10 '12 at 17:30

The major difference is on when each code runs. First one is delayed until return value is iterated while second one runs immediately. What I mean is that the for loop is forcing the iteration to run. The fact that the class exposes a IEnumerable<T> and in this case is delayed is another thing.

This does not provide any benefit over simple Select. yield's real power is when there is a conditional involved:

foreach(var ent in ents)
{
    if(someCondition)
    yield return new MyBusinessEnt {
        Id = ent.Id,
        Code = ent.Code
    };
}
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5  
Well hold on a minute -- your version doesn't provide any benefit over a simple Where followed by Select. And yes, Chris Shouts' comment is correct; both defer execution. –  Eric Lippert Feb 10 '12 at 17:14
    
@EricLippert yes since he is using a loop and not select. But as I said, I would just use plain Linq in this case. –  Aliostad Feb 10 '12 at 17:15
    
Are you sure about this? I thought that both created their values on demand effectively - ie the second one does not run immediately. –  Chris Feb 10 '12 at 17:15
3  
@Aliostad: The first one immediately returns an object that delays its execution until MoveNext is called. The second one returns an object that delays its execution until MoveNext is called. They both use delayed execution. But yes, there are "two hops" to get the data out of the first one, and only "one hop" in the second one. The performance difference is likely to be small. –  Eric Lippert Feb 10 '12 at 17:23
1  
@Aliostad: I assume the downvote is for "second one runs immediately." That statement is too easy to interpret as meaning that the second has does not have delayed execution. –  Brian Feb 10 '12 at 18:31

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