Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is the pumping lemma to demonstare that a language is not regular:If L is a regular language,there is a const N such that, for each z in L, with |z|>=N, is possibile to divide z in three sub-strings (uvw=z)such that:

1)|uv|<=N;  
2)|v|>=1;  
3)For each k>=0, uv^kw in L.  

N must be less or equal than the minumum number of states of the DFA accepting L.So to apply the pumping lemma I need to know how many states will have the minimal DFA accepting L.Is there a way to know how many states will have backwards?So is possibile to know the minimal number of states without building the minimal DFA?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

N must be less or equal than the minumum number of states of the DFA accepting L

N cannot be less than the number of states in a minimal DFA accepting L; otherwise, the DFA couldn't accept L (if it could, you would have a DFA accepting L smaller than the minimal DFA accepting L, a contradiction). We can safely assume that N is equal to the number of states in the minimal DFA accepting L (such DFAs are unique).

So to apply the pumping lemma I need to know how many states will have the minimal DFA accepting L

This is not strictly true. In most pumping lemma proofs, it doesn't matter what N actually is; you just have to make sure that the target string satisfies the other properties. It is possible, given a DFA, to determine how many states a minimal DFA will have; however, if you have a DFA, there's no need to bother with the pumping lemma, since you already know L is regular. In fact, determining an N such that there's a minimal DFA with N states accepting L constitutes a valid proof that the language in question is indeed regular.

So is possibile to know the minimal number of states without building the minimal DFA?

By analyzing the description of the language and using the Myhill-Nerode theorem, it is possible to construct a proof that a language is regular and find the number of states in a minimal DFA, without actually building the minimal DFA (although once you have completed such a proof using Myhill-Nerode, construction of a minimal DFA is a trivial exercise). You can also use Myhill-Nerode as an alternative to the pumping lemma to prove languages aren't regular, by showing a minimal DFA for the language would need to have infinitely many states, a contradiction.

Please let me know whether these observations answer your questions; I will be happy to provide additional clarification.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you provide some source? –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Feb 10 '12 at 18:09
    
@RamyAlZuhouri Proof of the pumping lemma for regular languages, courtesy Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… . The Myhill-Nerode Theorem, courtesy Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myhill-Nerode_theorem . These look decently correct, but if you want more academic sources, I would suggest following some of the references on those pages. If you have trouble following the proofs or techniques on those pages, please let me know. –  Patrick87 Feb 10 '12 at 18:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.