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I am trying to in-place edit a bunch of text files using Perl's in-place edit operator $^I. I traverse through the directory using the diamond (<>) operator like this:

$^I = ".bak";

@ARGV = <*.txt>;

while (<>)
{
    s/((?:^|\s)-?)(0+)(?=\s|$)/$1.$2/g;
    print;
}

This works perfectly and does the job I need it to do. But what if my @ARGV is already populated with some other data I need for the program? I tried to do the following:

$^I = ".bak";

my @files = <*.txt>;

while (<@files>)
{
    s/((?:^|\s)-?)(0+)(?=\s|$)/$1.$2/g;
    print;
}

But it does not work. What I am I missing here? I can't use my $ARGV as it contains other data and can't mess it with file matching patterns.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can copy your arguments beforehand, and then use @ARGV. E.g.:

my @args = @ARGV;
@ARGV = <*.txt>;

Since there is some hidden processing going on, which is specific to the use of @ARGV and the diamond operator <>, you cannot just use another array to do the same thing.

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I actually thought about this approach already. But I thought I was making mistakes in the way I was using the diamond operator. Just out of curiosity, is there a way to do this without creating a copy of ARGV first? –  Golam Kawsar Feb 10 '12 at 17:44
    
@GolamKawsar Of course. But not as easily. You could simply write out the code which does the in-place edit in full. I'm not sure what the purpose of this would be, though. –  TLP Feb 10 '12 at 17:49
1  
@GolamKawsar the behavior of unadorned while (<>) is tied to the so-called "magic ARGV" filehandle, which (unsurprisingly based on its name) is connected with the @ARGV array. If you want the one, you need to use the other. The alternative, as @TLP says, is not to use magic-ARGV or $^I at all and write the equivalent code yourself. –  hobbs Feb 10 '12 at 18:25
    
@hobbs thanks for the explanation! –  Golam Kawsar Feb 10 '12 at 18:34
    
@Golam Kawsar, Use a reference if you want to avoid a copy: my $orig_ARGV = \@ARGV; local @ARGV = <*.txt>; ...; Mind you, that sounds like "premature" optimisation. –  ikegami Feb 11 '12 at 2:25
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You can give @ARGV a temporary value with the local keyword:

{
    local @ARGV = <*.txt>;
    while (<>) {...}
} # @ARGV gets the old value back
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But then you cannot access the arguments while parsing the files. –  TLP Feb 10 '12 at 17:50
    
@TLP: that's true. But luckily in this case I don't need the arguments in the while block! I think this is a neat approach! –  Golam Kawsar Feb 10 '12 at 17:52
    
@GolamKawsar It's actually the same approach as mine, except using local to create a copy of @ARGV, instead of my. –  TLP Feb 10 '12 at 17:56
    
@TLP: Except this copying is hidden from you and is transparently taken care of by Perl :) –  Golam Kawsar Feb 10 '12 at 17:57
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Couldn't you just store the information from @ARGV that you still need into another variable?

$^I = ".bak";

my @options = @ARGV;
@ARGV = <*.txt>;

while (<>)
{
    s/((?:^|\s)-?)(0+)(?=\s|$)/$1.$2/g;
    print;
}
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I would use Iterator::Files, see http://search.cpan.org/perldoc/Iterator::Diamond for reasons why

use Iterator::Files;
my $input = Iterator::Files->new( files => [ glob "*.txt" ] );
while( <$input> ){
    s/((?:^|\s)-?)(0+)(?=\s|$)/$1.$2/g;
    print;
}
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My usual approach for this is to process the arguments and save the files off in a temporary list, then stuff them back into @ARGV.

my @files;
foreach (@ARGV) {
    ... do something with each parm
    else {
        push @files,$_;
    }
}
@ARGV=@files;
while (<>) {
    ...

Usually, in the foreach (@ARGV) I will do something like

if (-f) {
    push @files,$_;
    next;
}
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