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I wrote this simple piece of code(it actually calculates sine, cosine or tangent values of x according to s,c or t given as input) which works fine until I tried to change the order of statements just a bit....this one works fine.....

#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>
void main()
{
char T;
float x;
printf("\nPress s or S for sin(x); c or C for cos(x); t or T for tan(x)\n\n");
scanf("%c", &T);
printf("Enter the value of x: ");
scanf("%f",&x);

if(T=='s'||T=='S')
{
    printf("sin(x) = %f", sin(x));
}
else if(T=='c'||T=='C')
{
    printf("cos(x) = %f", cos(x));
}
else if(T=='t'||T=='T')
{
    printf("tan(x) = %f", tan(x));
}
}

*BUT*as soon as I change the arrangement to the following the compiler asks for the value of x and skips the scanf for char T and returns nothing... Can anybody explain what's happening here???

#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>
void main()
{
char T;
float x;

printf("Enter the value of x: ");
scanf("%f",&x);
printf("\nPress s or S for sin(x); c or C for cos(x); t or T for tan(x)\n\n");
scanf("%c", &T);
if(T=='s'||T=='S')
{
    printf("sin(x) = %f", sin(x));
}
else if(T=='c'||T=='C')
{
    printf("cos(x) = %f", cos(x));
}
else if(T=='t'||T=='T')
{
    printf("tan(x) = %f", tan(x));
}
}
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void main() is not the correct signature for the entry point. You're looking for int main(void). –  Cody Gray Feb 10 '12 at 17:58
    
but the previous one is running fine...?? –  bluedroid Feb 10 '12 at 18:01
    
even with int main() it's skipping the second scanf... –  bluedroid Feb 10 '12 at 18:04
1  
Hint: The compiler doesn't have a bug and isn't "skipping" anything. First Rule of Programming: It's always your fault. –  Brian Roach Feb 10 '12 at 18:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is because scanf for %c takes a single character - any character, including '\n'. When you hit "return" button after entering your float value, I/O system gives you the float, and buffers the "return" character. When you call scanf with %c, the character is already there, so it gives it to you right away.

To address this problem, create a buffer for a string, call scanf with %s, and use the first character of the string as your selector character, like this:

char buf[32];
printf("\nPress s or S for sin(x); c or C for cos(x); t or T for tan(x)\n\n");
scanf("%30s", buf);
T = buf[0];
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