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The situation: I have a background image in the body. A canvas context is drawn over that. Then I create shapes over the canvas using the "xor" Global Composite Operation to exclude the overlapping area and render it transparent. This creates cutouts in the canvas, through which you can see portions of the background. So far, all is going well with one minor exception.

The problem: I really like the way my site is not fixed to a certain position. It is flexible. It is not entirely mobile friendly but fits inside a page that is 1024 X 768. The only way to break the layout is by making the window smaller. When you grab the left side of the browser window and drag it to shrink the window to 1000px or less, the cutouts in the canvas move to the right and reveal the wrong part of the background image.

What I want: I am looking for a way to secure the canvas over the dimensions of the background image (a 675 X 600 px area), without losing too much flexibility. The simplest solution to the issue is the most desirable.

My layout is very simple.

THE HTML:

<div id="container">
    <a href="#" id="LftButton" class="hidden">
        <img alt="Previous Frame Button" src="imageFiles/arrowButtonLft.png" />
    </a>
    <a href="#" id="RtButton" onClick="nextWindow()" class="hidden">
        <img alt="Next Frame Button" src="imageFiles/arrowButtonRt.png" />
    </a>
    <div id="canvasWrapper">
        <canvas id="myCanvas" width="675" height="600">
            <p>Your browser doesn't support canvas.</p>
        </canvas>
    <script src="aboutMeScript.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    </div>
</div>

THE CSS:

body{
padding:0px;
height:775px;
width:985px;
margin:auto;
font-family:"Courier New", Courier, monospace;
font-size:12px;
background-repeat:no-repeat;
background-position:50% 145px;
background-image:url(imageFiles/bubsAndSqs.gif);
font-weight:normal;
}
#container{
width:985px;
height:600px;
clear:both;
margin:auto;
}
#myCanvas{
width:675px;
height:600px;
float:left;
}
#canvasWrapper{
width:675px;
height:600px;
margin:auto;
}
#RtButton{
float:right;
margin-right:34px;
}
#LftButton{
float:left;
margin-left:34px;
}
#RtButton, #LftButton{
margin-top:200px;
}

It seems like the Javascript is irrelevant here. I'll post it if someone needs to see it, but this is more a style issue than anything. Any input would be greatly appreciated!

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closed as too localized by ЯegDwight, Jav_Rock, Toon Krijthe, Jakob Bowyer, Andro Selva Oct 2 '12 at 8:56

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I stuck the background image into the canvas wrapper.

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Might want to try adding absolute positioning on the canvas wrapper with left 50% and a negative margin at half the width (675/2).

#canvasWrapper{
    width:675px;
    height:600px;
    position: absolute;
    left: 50%; /* if you want vertical centering */
    top: 50%;
    margin: -300px 0 0 -337px;
}

Just trying to picture it in my head, as what I think you mean is that once the browser gets too small to hold the entire canvas width-wise it no longer remains centered and begins overflowing on the right side, butting up against the left side of the browser, while the background image continues to stay centered. If I'm on the wrong track here, then maybe you could post an example link.

share|improve this answer
    
No that didn't work b/c it positioned my canvas in the wrong location from the onset. Absolute positioning is the likely solution. If you make the browser smaller by dragging the left edge of the browser to the right, the BG img stays and the canvas moves off the screen to the right. Similarly, if you drag the right edge of the browser to the left, the canvas appears to stay in place, while the BG img moves off the screen to the left. I am not certain that I understand exactly what is occurring here. I need to read more! Here's my site –  user1193509 Feb 14 '12 at 22:27
    
I actually decided to go with putting the background image in the canvas wrapper. Thanks for your help! –  user1193509 Feb 15 '12 at 0:06