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I need to do some cassandra for study project.

It's really simple:

One Column Family, two colums (let's say 'name' and 'mail')

Now I wanna insert some data to Cassandra like

'name' => 'Horst', 'mail' => 'Horst@Horstweb.com'

Don't need nothing more - but cassandra needs an sub name for the column family.

columnFamilyName.ABC ( ... )

Is there a way to insert data without this ABC? I only need the columns - nothing more.

Thank's allot for your help.

Pascal

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Row keys are required and they must be unique -- think of them like primary keys in an RDBMS. If you don't care what they are and you just need them to be unique, you would normally use a UUID. But since you only have two rows, why not just name them 'a' and 'b'?

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Oh, I'm sory! I meant "columns" - not "rows". – PascalTurbo Feb 11 '12 at 16:13
    
Ah, okay, that's a different question. @DNA explains some of this in his answer, but you could just store the data as the column name and use an empty column value. – Tyler Hobbs Feb 13 '12 at 15:50

No, you must always have a row name (key). Pretty much anything will do if you just need a dummy row key:

row1 -> name    mail
        Horst   Horst@Horstweb.com

Or, in principle, you could use row keys instead of column names:

name -> value
        Horst

mail -> value
        Horst@Horstweb.com

or even:

name -> Horst
        []

mail -> Horst@Horstweb.com
        []

Where [] indicates an empty value (Cassandra column values can be left empty).

This is just using Cassandra as a simple hashtable i.e. wasting most of Cassandra's column-store capabilities!

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