Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Given a vector t. How can I fill a matrix like

t[1] t[1] t[1] ... t[1]  
t[1] t[2] t[2] ... t[2]  
t[1] t[2] t[3] ... t[3]  
...  ...  ...  ...  ...  
t[1] t[2] t[3] ... t[n]

that corresponds to a covariance matrix for Brownian motion at times t?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's one way.

t <- 11:15
m <- vapply(seq_along(t), function(i) c(t[seq_len(i)], rep(t[i], length(t)-i)), numeric(length(t)))
m
#     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
#[1,]   11   11   11   11   11
#[2,]   11   12   12   12   12
#[3,]   11   12   13   13   13
#[4,]   11   12   13   14   14
#[5,]   11   12   13   14   15

You could use sapply too - a bit shorter but also a bit slower (you don't specify what the function returns):

m <- sapply(seq_along(t), function(i) c(t[seq_len(i)], rep(t[i], length(t)-i)))
share|improve this answer

The value of the (i,j) coefficient is min(i,j):

m <- matrix( NA, nr=5, nc=5 ) # Empty matrix with the right size
m <- pmin( col(m), row(m) )
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like this solution is a bit faster than @Tommy's. – Roman Luštrik Feb 11 '12 at 13:20
    
@Vincent I tried to generalize your answer to general vector t, as follows m <- pmin(t[col(m)], t[row(m)]) but this give me a vector of size nc*nr, so I applied the matrix command again – jmbarrios Feb 13 '12 at 18:39
1  
That should be pmin(col(t), row(t)), if your matrix is really called t. I changed the name of the matrix from t to m because t is already the transpose function. – Vincent Zoonekynd Feb 13 '12 at 22:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.