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I'm trying to streamline this script. I have 50 of these if e.keyCode statements, so double nesting if/else statements seems ridiculous, but all other attempts I've made haven't worked.

The first if/else statement if(e.keyCode == 66 && e.shiftKey) is necessary, but I'm not sure about the second if (typedAdjusted >= paperWidth % charWidth) which is throwing a warning if too many characters are typed on a line relative to a fixed width.

Can the functionality if (typedAdjusted >= paperWidth % charWidth) gives me be global? It will need to be checked against specific keyCodes. For instance, the letter "B" should be figured into typedAdjusted while BACKSPACE and TAB and COMMAND should not.

var typed = $("span.char").length;
var typedAdjusted = typed+1;
var paperWidth = 900;
var charWidth = 44;

if (e.keyCode  == 66)  {
    if (e.keyCode  == 66  && e.shiftKey)  {
        $('#charLine-1').append('<span class="char">B</span>');
        if (typedAdjusted  >= paperWidth % charWidth) {
            $('body').append('<span id="warning">WARNING!</span>');
        }
        else {
            return false;
        }
    } 
    else  {
        $('#charLine-1').append('<span class="char">b</span>');
        if (typedAdjusted  >= paperWidth % charWidth) {
            $('body').append('<span id="warning">WARNING!</span>');
        }
        else {
            return false;
        }        
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

IF you like checking each one use a switch: call the checkKey function as needed passing the event.

function checklen() {
    var typed = $("span.char").length;
    var typedAdjusted = typed + 1;
    var paperWidth = 900;
    var charWidth = 44;
    return (typedAdjusted >= paperWidth % charWidth);
}

function checkKey(e) {
    var mychar = '';
    var checkit = false;
    switch (e.keyCode) {
    case 66:
        mychar = e.shiftKey ? 'B' : 'b';
        checkit = checklen();
        break;
    case 67:
        mychar = e.shiftKey ? 'C' : 'c';
        checkit = checklen();
        break;
    case 68:
        mychar = e.shiftKey ? 'D' : 'd';
        checkit = checklen();
        break;

    default:
        checkit = false;
        break;
    }
    if (!checkit) {
        $('#charLine-1').append('<span class="char">' + mychar + '</span>');
    }
    else {
        $('body').append('<span id="warning">WARNING!</span>');
    }
}

to get it to work on the entire document:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $(document).keydown(function(e) { 
     checkKey(e);
  });
});

then just click on the page and type characters - note only 'b','c','d' on the code above.

share|improve this answer
    
mychar = e.shiftKey ? mychar = 'B' : mychar = 'b'; That seems a bit redundant :P –  Xyan Ewing Feb 10 '12 at 20:27
    
@MarkSchultheiss This seems like the direction I should go, but doesn't seem to work — jsbin.com/owaraw/2 –  pardon Feb 10 '12 at 20:32
    
I fixed my stupid rapidly typed syntax :) sample: jsfiddle.net/MarkSchultheiss/6Svcb –  Mark Schultheiss Feb 10 '12 at 20:34
    
note: IF you want the default to NOT append, make sure you change the checkit=false; statement in there. Note that I am working (in my sample page) with an input element for the key detection. Yours may differ. –  Mark Schultheiss Feb 10 '12 at 20:46
    
@MarkSchultheiss jsfiddle seems to be down. i popped the edited code into jsbin here jsbin.com/owaraw/8/edit but that also doesn't seem to work. –  pardon Feb 10 '12 at 21:03

What do you mean by having 50 of them? You... don't mean one for each letter?

And why do you check for the keycode value twice? Do you see that the code is precisely identical except for the character???

Keep a lookup table, or direct character translation, and shorten it to a single method:

var c = lookup(e.keyCode, e.shiftKey);
$('#charLine-1').append('<span class="char">' + c + '</span>');
if (typedAdjusted  >= paperWidth % charWidth) {
    $('body').append('<span id="warning">WARNING!</span>');
} else {
    return false;
}

That's going to create a whole bunch of spans.


var normal = {
  66: 'b', 67: 'c', // etc.
};

var shifted = {
  66: 'B', 67: 'C', // etc.
};

/** 
 * Looks up keycode using appropriate map.
 *
 * Returns `undefined` if not found; shouldn't insert.
 */
function lookup(code, shift) {
  return shift ? shifted[code] : normal[code];
}
share|improve this answer
    
There are 50 of them because I'm creating a virtual typewriter based on a real typewriter with 50 keys. There is a if(e.keyCode == ##) for all 50 keys. The keycode is checked twice to account for keycode combinations (shift+b = B; shift+2 = @).Thanks for the tip about the lookup table. I'll give that a try and see if that works for me (new to JS, just learned of their existence). –  pardon Feb 10 '12 at 19:30
    
@pardon But you don't need to re-check the keycode; if it made it past the first if, you already know the keycode is what you checked for. But a lookup table is a far, far more reasonable solution. It's just a map/hash or array, which J. Random Mechanism for handling the shift--either adding an index offset, switching maps/arrays, whatever. –  Dave Newton Feb 10 '12 at 19:38
    
Many thanks for the suggestion. Hopefully that will help. A bit confused about the hash. Were you suggesting something like: var myChar = {}; myHash['a'] = [65]; myHash['b'] = [66]; myHash['c'] = [67]; and on shiftkey detection, call... var myShiftChar = {}; myHash['A'] = [65]; myHash['B'] = [66]; myHash['C'] = [67]; –  pardon Feb 10 '12 at 20:04
    
@pardon See updated answer. Your hash is backwards, you want to lookup based on the code, not the letter. Yours also creates a single-element array for each entry. –  Dave Newton Feb 10 '12 at 20:23

If you observe the keypress event, you can use String.fromCharCode(event.keyCode) to get the character entered and not have to mess with a lookup table.

function (event) {
    var key = event.keyCode;
    if (key > 31 && key < 127) return String.fromCharCode(key);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This wont work for detecting keycode combinations. –  pardon Feb 10 '12 at 21:29
    
Yes, it will. At least it works for me in Chrome. If I press the "a" key, it returns "a"; if I press Shift+a, it returns "A". If I press 2, it returns "2"; if I press Shift+2, it returns "@". If you still need to know if the shift key was depressed, check event.shiftKey. –  Steve Feb 10 '12 at 22:16
    
Unfortunately I wont be using the keyboard's default keycode combinations. For example, on my keyboard shift + 6 = ^, but I'll need shift + 6 = - –  pardon Feb 10 '12 at 22:32

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