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We have a set of DLLs written in C++ for Windows that are used by a C# application, and all of this is wrapped up in a Visual Studio solution. Now someone has ported the DLLs to Qt so they can be used on other OSs. Can I switch to the Qt code within my solution and continue to have it work with the C# app? Or will I have to split into two solutions?

I've tried doing this already but when I try to build I get the errors

"The operation could not be completed. The parameter is incorrect"

or

"Cannot perform requested action because a built is already in progress"

FYI, I'm using the Qt V4.8.0 prebuilt binaries for VS2010.

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2 Answers 2

We have a C++ project at work that includes both DLLs built with Qt and ones that have no idea that Qt is there. This builds fine in VS2010, but we are not using qmake to build the Qt projects; it's MSBUILD all the way and we have to specifically run certain executables that qmake "magically" runs as part of the build (like moc).

That said, there might be a slight difference as we're building our own set of binaries based on the commercial code rather than use the prebuilt ones.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

It turned out that when my colleague had done the Qt port he'd recreated some of the Visual Studio project files, which resulted in them having different GUIDs to the originals. When I switched to the Qt port the GUIDs didn't match what the C# projects had listed as dependencies. Visual Studio is a bit crap at handling this (or telling you), so you get the errors listed above.

Once we fixed this the build worked fine but running it didn't do anything - the C++ DLLs never responded. Eventually I realised that in order for the Qt timers and queues to work we had to call QCoreApplication within the DLL, since we weren't using a Qt UI. However, since there were some Qt UIs that used the same DLLs we couldn't always call QCoreApplication in case the UI had already called QApplication. You can use QCoreApplication::instance() to check if a call is required, but you can't do this in DllMain() on DLL_PROCESS_ATTACH because firstly it's too early and secondly that's Windows specific. So we came up with this:

static struct Vars
{
    QCoreApplication    *l_pQt;
    bool                l_bQtCoreCreated;

    Vars()
        : l_pQt(NULL), l_bQtCoreCreated(false)
    {
    }

    virtual ~Vars()
    {
        if (l_pQt != NULL)
        {
            if (l_bQtCoreCreated)
            {
                delete l_pQt;
            }
            l_pQt = NULL;
            l_bQtCoreCreated = false;
        }
    }
} g_private;


static void InitQtCore(void)
{
    if (g_private.l_pQt == NULL)
    {
        g_private.l_pQt = QCoreApplication::instance();
        if (g_private.l_pQt == NULL)
        {
            g_private.l_bQtCoreCreated = true;
            int argc = 0;
            char    *argv = NULL;
            g_private.l_pQt = new QCoreApplication(argc, &argv);
        }
    }
}

Any function in the DLL that isn't just basic setup calls InitQtCore() at the start. This works fine for Qt and non-Qt UIs (C# and C++).

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