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I found a funny issue with DB2 v9.7 and the SQL LIKE operator. Check this out:

-- this works and returns one record
select 1 
from SYSIBM.DUAL
where 'abc' like concat('a', 'bc') 

-- this doesn't work
select 1 
from SYSIBM.DUAL
where 'abc' like concat(cast('a' as varchar(2001)), cast('bc' as varchar(2000)))

-- It causes this error (from JDBC):
-- No authorized routine named "LIKE" of type "FUNCTION" having compatible 
-- arguments was found.. SQLCODE=-440, SQLSTATE=42884, DRIVER=4.7.85

I've played around with the lengths and it seems that the problem appears as soon as lengths add up to be larger than 4000. If I "truncate" the whole concatenated string back to length 4000, the problem disappears:

select 1 
from SYSIBM.DUAL
where 'abc' like 
  cast(concat(cast('a' as varchar(2001)), cast('bc' as varchar(2000)))
  as varchar(4000))

Interestingly, it really seems to be related to the CONCAT function. The following works as well:

select 1 
from SYSIBM.DUAL
where 'abc' like cast('abc' as varchar(32672))

Has anyone experienced such an issue? Is it a bug in DB2? Or some undocumented restriction? N.B: I found a similar issue here:

https://www-304.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg1PM18687

Given that another IBM product creates a workaround for this issue in 2010, I guess it's not really a bug, otherwise it would have been fixed in the mean time?

share|improve this question
    
It could be more related to the interaction with the JDBC driver - I'm not getting any errors when running that natively on my iSeries (V6R1). –  Clockwork-Muse Feb 10 '12 at 21:50
    
@X-Zero: Not in my case. I can reproduce the same error 42884 on the console... –  Lukas Eder Feb 10 '12 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Edit: Aha!

While searching the Information Center for another bit of knowledge on VARCHARs, I discovered this nifty tidbit of information on the character data type page:

The functions in the SYSFUN schema taking a VARCHAR as an argument will not accept VARCHARs greater than 4 000 bytes long as an argument. However, many of these functions also have an alternative signature accepting a CLOB(1M). For these functions, the user may explicitly cast the greater than 4 000 VARCHAR strings into CLOBs and then recast the result back into VARCHARs of desired length.

So, it looks like it's a known "feature" of DB2.

I did some additional testing, and it looks like the "workaround" mentioned above works for DB2 on Linux/Unix/Windows, but does not work for DB2 on the Mainframe.


Going off of the SQL and XML Limits page from the Information center, if you look at Table 7 (third row), it says that the maximum length of a row including all overhead for a table space with a 4k page size is 4005 bytes.

My guess is that SYSIBM.DUAL is in a 4k pagesize table space, which is causing your error. You can check SYSCAT.TABLESPACES, which might confirm or deny this suspicion.

You can get the information with a query like so:

SELECT ts.PAGESIZE
FROM SYSCAT.TABLESPACES ts
JOIN SYSCAT.TABLES tb
  ON tb.TBSPACEID = ts.TBSPACEID
WHERE tb.TABSCHEMA = 'SYSIBM'
  AND tb.TABNAME   = 'DUAL'
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, that sounds much like what Michael suggested. But your query returns 8192 on my database instance. As I mentioned in the question, the problem only arises with CONCAT, not like this: where 'abc' like cast('abc' as varchar(32672))... funny –  Lukas Eder Feb 11 '12 at 17:30
1  
When I try this on DB2 Linux/Unix/Windows, I get the same result as you, but when trying it on z/OS, I get this error: ERROR [42824] [IBM][DB2] SQL0132N A LIKE predicate or POSSTR scalar function is not valid because the first operand is not a string expression or the second operand is not a string. A LOCATE or POSITION scalar function is not valid because the first operand is not a string or the second operand is not a string expression. SQLSTATE=42824. I'm not sure what's causing the problem, since any limit reference for VARCHAR I see has the max length at 32704. Interesting. :) –  bhamby Feb 13 '12 at 20:40
    
Very interesting indeed. If I knew how, I'd file a bug report to DB2... –  Lukas Eder Feb 13 '12 at 22:19
    
I believe you'd do it here (assuming you have the products registered to your IBM Account). You can find contact information for various regions here. Good luck! –  bhamby Feb 13 '12 at 22:45
1  
I'm guessing that this particularity is inherited from the Mainframe DB2, since it doesn't work the same on z/OS. The joys of DB2 on multiple platforms! –  bhamby Feb 28 '12 at 14:12

Could this possibly be related to the rowsize for the tablespace your table exists in?

I think if a a DB2 varchar extends beyond the rowsize for the table you're querying, it must be declared as a LONG VARCHAR, is stored external to the rest of the table data and referenced by a pointer, and LIKE queries are no longer possible. But I haven't used DB2 for some years. :)

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How can I check this? Does any such setting apply when selecting from SYSIBM.DUAL, too? And how would this explain that the problem only arises with CONCAT ? –  Lukas Eder Feb 10 '12 at 22:02

The real Aha! is here.

Firstly, According to the rules for the concatenation operator result type, concatenating two VARCHARs with the combined length of 4000 bytes or less produces a VARCHAR of that combined length, e.g. concat(varchar(2000), varchar(2000)) = varchar(4000). Concatenating two VARCHARs with the combined length of 4001 bytes or more produces a LONG VARCHAR with the length of 32 700. Though the LONG VARCHAR type is deprecated, I guess the concatenation behaviour still uses the legacy logic.

$ db2 describe "values concat(cast('a' as varchar(2000)), cast('bc' as varchar(2000)))"

Column Information

Number of columns: 1

SQL type              Type length  Column name                     Name length
--------------------  -----------  ------------------------------  -----------
448   VARCHAR                4000  1                                         1


$ db2 describe "values concat(cast('a' as varchar(2001)), cast('bc' as varchar(2000)))"

Column Information

Number of columns: 1

SQL type              Type length  Column name                     Name length
--------------------  -----------  ------------------------------  -----------
456   LONG VARCHAR          32700  1     

Secondly, the LIKE predicate expects the pattern expression to be a VARCHAR with the maximum length of 32672 bytes.

Subsequently, when you unknowingly attempt to use a LONG VARCHAR as the pattern expression, you get an error. It's not so much about the length of the operand as it is about its data type. The following should work:

select 1 
from SYSIBM.DUAL
where 'abc' like 
   cast(concat(cast('a' as varchar(2001)), cast('bc' as varchar(2000)))
   as varchar(32672))
share|improve this answer
    
That explains it well, thanks. It's still funny that the data type would be changed even if there's still large enough varchar types to cover the result... –  Lukas Eder Aug 20 '13 at 5:56
    
Must be a legacy of some sort. I opened a PMR for that, since LONG VARCHAR is deprecated and as such should not be returned by built-in functions. –  mustaccio Aug 20 '13 at 11:39
    
Nice. Would be interesting to post a link to that PMR here, to keep track of it –  Lukas Eder Aug 20 '13 at 12:00
    
Not possible. For obvious reasons only the creator, and those authorized within the organization, can see it. –  mustaccio Aug 20 '13 at 13:49
1  
Just to put this issue to rest, the PMR got rejected because "it's working as designed" and "there is a workaround". So there. –  mustaccio Sep 10 '13 at 0:35

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