Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I always used something like this:

$("a.button").click(function() {
    data = ...;
    url = ...;
    $.post(url, data, function() {
        $(this).toggleClass('active');
    });
});

The problem is when an user has a slow connection and clicks on that button, it doesn't seems to do anything, because the button will change the own status (adding the active class) once the request is complete. Of course I can "fix" this behavior by adding a spinner while the request is loading.

Now check out this one:

$("a.button").click(function() {
    $(this).toggleClass('active');
    data = ...;
    url = ...;
    $.post(url, data, function() {
        // if request is successful do nothing
        // else, if there's an error: $(this).toggleClass('active)
    });
});

In other words, I change the button status instantly when the button is pressed and after this, I check for success/error. Is this a good way? What you think about? Are there other ways?

share|improve this question
    
It depends... Do you want your button to be set as active during the whole time of the Ajax request or just during the instant the user clicks it? –  Nabab Feb 10 '12 at 20:05
    
Yeah, based on your description it's a good way. –  Kane Cohen Feb 10 '12 at 20:06
1  
Also you cannot use $(this) inside $.post. You have to define it before: var $t = $(this); $.post(....function(){ $t.toggleClass(.. –  Nabab Feb 10 '12 at 20:07
    
@Nabab: I'm asking for that. If I add the active class once the request is completed I need to add a loading spinner. –  Fred Collins Feb 11 '12 at 15:12
    
Sorry, asking for what? –  Nabab Feb 11 '12 at 15:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is more of a UI question than code. Personally I prefer to show the spinner in cases where it could be confusing if there is no response. Since I don't know what class you're toggling and what effect it has on the element, I wouldn't know if toggling before success would be confusing at all.

One way or another, everyone alive knows the loading spinner. It's probably safe to go with that.

share|improve this answer

You've got the general idea there. You can implement it in other ways, for instance by setting global AJAX ajaxStart and ajaxSuccess functions:

$("a.button").click(function() {
    data = ...;
    url = ...;
    $.post(url, data, function() {
        // if request is successful do nothing
    });
}).ajaxStart(function () {
    $(this).toggleClass('active');
}).ajaxComplete(function () {
    $(this).toggleClass('active');
}).ajaxError(function () {
    //never forget to add error handling, you can show the user a message or maybe try the AJAX request again
});

These methods register handlers to be called when certain events, such as initialization or completion, take place for any AJAX request on the page. The global events are fired on each AJAX request if the global property in jQuery.ajaxSetup() is true, which it is by default. Note: Global events are never fired for cross-domain script or JSONP requests, regardless of the value of global.

Source: http://api.jquery.com/category/ajax/global-ajax-event-handlers/

share|improve this answer
    
If you're using ajaxStart, shouldn't you use ajaxStop? –  James Montagne Feb 10 '12 at 20:15
    
@JamesMontagne: ajaxStop runs when ALL ajax requests are done, where as ajaxComplete runs for each one. –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 10 '12 at 20:18
    
@Rocket Right, but he's using ajaxStart which runs only once for overlapping requests. So you will toggle once at the start and then potentially toggle multiple times on complete. Unless I'm misunderstanding, this could cause unexpected behavior. –  James Montagne Feb 10 '12 at 20:19
    
@JamesMontagne ajaxStop runs whenever the AJAX request is done, ajaxComplete runs for a successful AJAX response, and ajaxError runs for an un-successful AJAX response. so the bases are covered, I like to use complete/error so my error code is separate from my success code. –  Jasper Feb 10 '12 at 20:22
    
@JamesMontagne: You're right, ajaxStart only runs once, too. ajaxSend runs for each request. –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 10 '12 at 20:22

Use $.ajax success:

From jquery docs:

$.ajax({
  url: "test.html",
  success: function(){
    $(this).addClass("done");
  }
});
share|improve this answer

You could do something like:

$("a.button").click(function() {
    var old_text = $(this).text();
    var button = $(this);
    $(this).text('Processing...');
    $(this).attr('disabled', 'disabled'); // disable to button to make sure it cannot be clicked
    data = ...;
    url = ...;
    $.post(url, data, function() {
        // after request has finished, re-enable the link
        $(button).removeAttr('disabled');
        $(button).text(old_text);
    });
});

Next thing, you should do something similar for catching errors (re-enable the button).

share|improve this answer

It always depends the way you've built your site, but in my opinion the active state should only be triggered at the instant you click.

So that should be: onmousedown you add your class and onmouseup you remove it.

The Ajax call could trigger a different function maybe showing a loading dialog/spinner.

There are several ways of building it: individually on each element as you did, or through a general styling function. Same for Ajax with the ajaxStart ajaxComplete functions as Jasper said.

Personally I'm using Ajax intensively, always changing the DOM dynamically, so I use livequery to setup style changing with events automatically when elements with given class(es) appear in the DOM, and I use ajaxStart and ajaxComplete for displaying a loading dialog.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.