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does anyone have ideas how to compare the result of 2 queries, that have the same columns names, but in different order?

I know that if I had both queries returning the same columns in the same order, I could use except, this isn't the case.

[EDIT]

To be more specific, I need to compare the value of each row, and each column (with the same name) from 2 different queries.

Example:

result query 1:

A|B|C|D
1|4|7|11
2|5|8|21
3|**6**|9|31

result query 2:

A|B |D
1|4 |11
2|5 |21
3|**99**|31

In this case, I would like to detect that Query2 on 3º row in column B, have a different value. I don't care that Query2 don't have the column C, I just want that all common columns, between both queries, have the same values.

Thanks

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1  
What type of comparison are you wanting to make? –  Michael Fredrickson Feb 10 '12 at 20:15
    
Compare how? Find all the rows in A that are not in B? –  Chris Shain Feb 10 '12 at 20:16
    
Need way more information in here ... way too generic ... not much can be said at this level. –  judda Feb 10 '12 at 20:18
    
Please post the queries (TSQL) and define compare. –  Blam Feb 10 '12 at 20:30
    
You want to compare all of the columns that are common to both tables, without having to specify the column names? –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 10 '12 at 20:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Given these tables and data:

USE tempdb;
GO

CREATE TABLE dbo.TableA
(
    A INT,
    B INT,
    C INT,
    D INT
);

CREATE TABLE dbo.TableB
(
    A INT,
    D INT,
    B INT
);

INSERT dbo.TableA SELECT 1,4,7,11
    UNION ALL SELECT 2,5,8,21
    UNION ALL SELECT 3,6,9,31;

INSERT dbo.TableB SELECT 1,11,4
    UNION ALL SELECT 2,21,5
    UNION ALL SELECT 3,31,99;

What you seem to be looking for is one of the following:

-- those where at least one column doesn't match:
SELECT A,B,D FROM dbo.TableA
EXCEPT 
SELECT A,B,D FROM dbo.TableB;

Results (from the A side):

A    B    D
---- ---- ----
3    6    31

OR

-- those where all columns DO match:
SELECT A,B,D FROM dbo.TableA 
INTERSECT 
SELECT A,B,D FROM dbo.TableB;

Results:

A    B    D
---- ---- ----
1    4    11
2    5    21

If you don't know the columns or don't want to write them out manually, you can do this with dynamic SQL by just passing the two table names (with schema) into variables. Note that this doesn't trap for the errors that will occur if no columns are shared by the two tables, or if the same column names exist but are of incompatible data types. That error handling is easy to add if you want to make the solution more robust.

DECLARE 
    @sql  NVARCHAR(MAX), 
    @cols NVARCHAR(MAX),
    @t1   NVARCHAR(511),
    @t2   NVARCHAR(511);

SELECT
    @sql  = N'',
    @cols = N'',
    @t1   = N'dbo.TableA',
    @t2   = N'dbo.TableB';

SELECT @cols = @cols + ',' + a.name
    FROM sys.columns AS a
    INNER JOIN sys.columns AS b
    ON a.name = b.name
    WHERE a.[object_id] = OBJECT_ID(@t1)
    AND b.[object_id] = OBJECT_ID(@t2);

SET @cols = STUFF(@cols, 1, 1, N'');

-- those where at least one column doesn't match:
SELECT @sql = N'SELECT ' + @cols + ' 
    FROM ' + @t1 + ' EXCEPT 
    SELECT ' + @cols + ' FROM ' + @t2 + ';';

EXEC sp_executesql @sql;

-- those where all columns DO match:
SELECT @sql = N'SELECT ' + @cols + ' 
    FROM ' + @t1 + ' INTERSECT 
    SELECT ' + @cols + ' FROM ' + @t2 + ';';

EXEC sp_executesql @sql;

Don't forget to clean up:

DROP TABLE dbo.TableA, dbo.TableB;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I will try your solution –  muek Feb 11 '12 at 3:34
    
Well you shouldn't accept the solution until you've tried it and validate that it worked. :-) –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 11 '12 at 3:35
    
Your solution will work. To make it more flexible, do you know how to get the columns names from a table function? I know how to get it from table, but not from a table function –  muek Feb 11 '12 at 3:37
    
I'm not following you at all. Do you mean you already have a table function that returns a set of column names? Maybe you should ask a separate question and explain what you mean (this shouldn't take place over a drawn-out set of comments). –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 11 '12 at 3:38

You can wrap your queries as subqueries and then reselect the columns in any order you want.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, but both queries have different number of columns. I would to make the comparison without having to confirm if all columns are in the same order. I'm talking about 50 columns. –  muek Feb 10 '12 at 20:47
    
RedFilter is correct - that's the best way of doing it. If you're not writing out the query, then you're probably just being lazy. (sorry) –  Nick Vaccaro Feb 10 '12 at 20:51
    
@Norla probably you are right, but I don't want to maintain 30 queries that are constantly being change. A good programmer must be a bit lazy :D –  muek Feb 10 '12 at 20:56
    
Ha ha! Story of my life! Email me if you ever figure out how to effectively maintain a database. : ) –  Nick Vaccaro Feb 10 '12 at 20:58

You can do it in only one step:

SELECT *
FROM   (
       --compare  query a vs query b 
    SELECT ad.id_addetto,'not in b'y
    FROM   addetti ad
    WHERE  ad.id_addetto < 125 -- query a
    EXCEPT
    SELECT ad.id_addetto,'not in b'y
    FROM   addetti ad
    WHERE  ad.id_addetto < 166 -- query b
     UNION
    --compare  query b vs query a
    SELECT ad.id_addetto, 'not in a'y
    FROM   addetti ad
    WHERE  ad.id_addetto < 166 -- query b
    EXCEPT
    SELECT ad.id_addetto ,'not in a'y
    FROM   addetti ad
    WHERE  ad.id_addetto < 125 -- query a
    ) xx
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