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Consider this example: When the user clicks a button, ClassA fires OnUserInteraction event rapidly 10 times. ClassB is attached to this event and in it's event handler it fires ClassC's Render method. In the Render method the AxisAngleRotation3D is executed, but every single animation is lasting 1 second.

In this scenario all 10 AxisAngleRotation3D animations are executed almost at the same time, but I would want them to execute one after another. As I understand threads, I would probably have to implement a thread queue in ClassB, where the Completed event of the AxisAngleRotation3D signals that the next event is allowed to fire...?

Is this correct and how can I achieve this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have a task queue. Simply put, have a ConcurrentQueue<Func<bool>> field or similar, and add tasks to it as necessary. Then have your task execution thread pop Func<bool> delegates off the queue and invoke them. If they return true, they're done. If they return false, add them back onto the queue, as they couldn't complete at that time.

Here's an example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Threading;

namespace Example
{
    public class TaskScheduler : IDisposable
    {
        public const int IDLE_DELAY = 100;

        private ConcurrentQueue<Func<bool>> PendingTasks;
        private Thread ExecuterThread;
        private volatile bool _IsDisposed;

        public bool IsDisposed
        {
            get { return _IsDisposed; }
        }

        public void EnqueueTask(Func<bool> task)
        {
            PendingTasks.Enqueue(task);
        }

        public void Start()
        {
            CheckDisposed();

            if (ExecuterThread != null)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException("The task scheduler is alreader running.");
            }

            ExecuterThread = new Thread(Run);
            ExecuterThread.IsBackground = true;
            ExecuterThread.Start();
        }

        private void CheckDisposed()
        {
            if (_IsDisposed)
            {
                throw new ObjectDisposedException("TaskScheduler");
            }
        }

        private void Run()
        {
            while (!_IsDisposed)
            {
                if (PendingTasks.IsEmpty)
                {
                    Thread.Sleep(IDLE_DELAY);
                    continue;
                }

                Func<bool> task;
                while (!PendingTasks.TryDequeue(out task))
                {
                    Thread.Sleep(0);
                }

                if (!task.Invoke())
                {
                    PendingTasks.Enqueue(task);
                }
            }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            CheckDisposed();
            _IsDisposed = true;
        }
    }
}
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Where do I instantiate an object of this type, in ´ClassB´? Will it 'run all the time' if you know what I mean? –  sventevit Feb 10 '12 at 21:18
    
Instantiate it in whatever object is overseeing all of this--for example, a form. It will run until disposed. I should probably fix that. –  Zenexer Feb 10 '12 at 21:31
    
Now it will check every 100 ms for new tasks when idle. –  Zenexer Feb 10 '12 at 21:34
    
Thanks, that is exactly what I needed. But one problem leads to another, if you have some spare time, this is my next question: stackoverflow.com/q/9241166/1110039 :) –  sventevit Feb 11 '12 at 15:02

ClassB could add the event to a queue and then render them one at a time (possibly use a timer to read from the queue).

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