Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using this simple algorithm for searching some text in document and taging on which page I found it

for (int i = 1; i <= a.PageCount; i++)
{
    Buf.Append(a.Pages[i].Text);
    String contain = Buf.ToString();
    if (contain != "")
    {
        // Inside is dictionary of keys and value contain page where I found it
        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, List<string>> pair in inside)
        {
              if (contain.Contains(pair.Key))
                  inside[pair.Key].Add((i).ToString());
        }
    }

    Buf.Clear();
 }

I have no problem with it, but when I search in 700 pages document and I am looking for over 500 keys, its very slow, took about 1-2 minutes to pass, is there any way how to speed it up? I am using c#

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What kind of document is a? Could you start with determining what keys are actually in the whole file and then just search for those on a page by page basis? –  John Koerner Feb 10 '12 at 21:27
    
Its pdf document, but it doesnt matter on file format, its come catalog of product and some pages contain table with product types - i need to create index of all keys - where they are - on which pages –  Martin Ch Feb 10 '12 at 21:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A few points:

  • Get rid of Buf; just assign a.Pages[i].Text directly to contain:
  • inside[pair.Key] wastes time looking up the value associated with that key; the time is wasted because you have a much cheaper reference to that object in pair.Value.
  • if you have a list of integer values, why are you storing them as strings?

Sample code:

for (int i = 1; i <= a.PageCount; i++)
{
    String contain = a.Pages[i].Text
    if (contain != "")
    {
        // Inside is dictionary of keys and value contain page where I found it
        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, List<int>> pair in inside)
        {
            if (contain.Contains(pair.Key))
                pair.Value.Add(i);
        }
    }
}

Finally, make sure Pages does in fact use a one-based index. Collections are more commonly zero-indexed.

EDIT since Pages is a dictionary:

foreach (KeyValuePair<int, Page> kvp in a.Pages)
{
    string contain = kvp.Value.Text;
    if (contain == "")
        continue;
    foreach (KeyValuePair<string, List<int>> pair in inside)
        if (contain.Contains(pair.Key))
            pair.Value.Add(kvp.Key);
}

How many times did you time the first code sample? The time could vary depending on many external factors; the fact that a single run of one approach is faster or slower than a single run of another doesn't really tell you much, especially since the suggestions I made probably don't address the bulk of the problem.

As someone else pointed out, the main problem is that you're calling contain.Contains(pair.Key) 350,000 times; that's probably your bottleneck. You can profile the method to find out if that is true. If it is true, then something like the Rabin Karp algorithm as suggested by Miserable Variable is probably your best bet.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried it, but it took longer than before, I have no idea why. Pages are Dictionary type and yes, its pages from pdfLibNet, and they are indexed starting by 1 –  Martin Ch Feb 10 '12 at 21:59
    
@MartinCh if it is a dictionary type then you could use "foreach (KeyValuePair<...` there, too, though the benefit will be smaller -- you're saving 700 lookups rather than 350K. –  phoog Feb 10 '12 at 22:06
    
thanks, after I run code analysis, I found out, that Pages[].Text took about 89% of processing time, so there is main problem –  Martin Ch Feb 10 '12 at 22:23
    
@MartinCh An excellent confirmation of the advice to profile your code before attempting to improve its performance! –  phoog Feb 10 '12 at 22:25

[[

EDIT: The following is irrelevant, since you are clearing Buf at the end of loop (though note that you don't really need buf, string pageText = a.Pages[i].Text is all you need)

What is Buf? You have

Buf.Append(a.Pages[i].Text);

Does that not force the Contains to look through increasingly large size strings? I am surprised you are not running out of memory with 700 pages.

]]

There are more efficient ways to see if any of a set of strings appears in another string. For example, you could prepare a tree structure of the keys so you don't have to compare multiple times.

See Rabin-Karp Algorithm

Do consider existing third party libraries, there must be some.

share|improve this answer
    
he clears Buf at the end of each iteration of the loop (at the bottom) –  hatchet Feb 10 '12 at 21:33
1  
I assume Buf is a StringBuilder. It's cleared each iteration, so apart from slowing down the program, it does nothing. –  dtb Feb 10 '12 at 21:33
    
Thanks, correcting my answer. –  Miserable Variable Feb 10 '12 at 21:35

I don't have 700 pages to test with, but you could try using a regex:

var s = Stopwatch.StartNew();
var r = new Regex(string.Join("|", from x in inside select Regex.Escape(x.Key)));

for (int i = 1; i <= a.PageCount; i++)
{
    foreach (Match match in r.Matches(a.Pages[i].Text))
    {
        inside[match.Value].Add(i.ToString());
    }
}

Console.WriteLine(s.Elapsed);
share|improve this answer
    
He has many keys to search for. Even for a single, I doubt regex can be faster for non-wildcard match but I could be wrong. –  Miserable Variable Feb 10 '12 at 21:41
    
I tried it - regex took 126 seconds, my version 93 seconds –  Martin Ch Feb 10 '12 at 21:50

Standard performance/debugging procedures - comment out pieces of your code and measure. Add them back one at a time until it 'gets bad.' That's likely your problem area.

for example, you might start by commenting out the entire foreach.

It looks like there's some possibly-complex/expensive objects in use - inside, Buf, etc. Comment out the usage of those and put them back one at a time.

share|improve this answer
    
seems unnecessary - with 500 keys and 700 pages, his algorithm is doing 350,000 searches of a page of text for a key. That is likely where the time is being taken. –  hatchet Feb 10 '12 at 21:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.