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I have some existing Core Data code that uses the 10.6-and-earlier pattern of creating a new NSManagedObjectContext in each new thread, performing data modifications as appropriate, saving the NSManagedObjectContext (and thus to the persistent store), and then any other contexts that need the changes can observe NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification and merge the changes.

For various reasons, I'm retrofitting this code to use 10.7's new multithreaded Core Data features, by changing the pattern so that all contexts I create are children of a shared context that has a NSPrivateQueueConcurrencyType. I save the contexts, and then the shared parent observes the NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotifications, but instead of merging the changes as before, I simply save the parent, thereby propagating the changes that way.

I'm also using two persistent stores: one store backed by an SQLite database on disk, and one backed by an in memory store. I'm storing cross-store relationships by saving the URI of the managed objects from one store in the other, like so:

- (AFStoredTrack *)storedTrack;
{
    [self willAccessValueForKey:@"storedTrack"];
    AFStoredTrack *theStoredTrack = [self primitiveStoredTrack];
    [self didAccessValueForKey:@"storedTrack"];

    if (theStoredTrack == nil) {
        NSString *IDString = [self storedTrackObjectIDString];
        if (IDString != nil) {
            if (! [IDString isEqualToString:@""]) {
                NSManagedObjectContext *objectContext = [self managedObjectContext];
                NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *coordinator = [objectContext persistentStoreCoordinator];
                NSURL *objectURL = [NSURL URLWithString:IDString];
                NSManagedObjectID *storedTrackObjectID = [coordinator managedObjectIDForURIRepresentation:objectURL];

                NSError *retrieveError = nil;
                theStoredTrack = (AFStoredTrack *)[objectContext existingObjectWithID:storedTrackObjectID error:&retrieveError];

                if (theStoredTrack) {
                    [self setPrimitiveStoredTrack:theStoredTrack];
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return theStoredTrack;
}

- (void)setStoredTrack:(AFStoredTrack *)aStoredTrack;
{
    [self willChangeValueForKey:@"storedTrack"];

    NSString *stringRepresentation = nil;
    if (aStoredTrack) {
        NSManagedObjectID *theObjectID = [aStoredTrack objectID];
        if ([theObjectID isTemporaryID]) {
            [NSException raise:@"AFTriedToSetTemporaryStoredTrack"
                        format:@"You tried to set a temporary AFStoredTrack!"];
        }
        stringRepresentation = [[theObjectID URIRepresentation] absoluteString];
    }

    [self setPrimitiveStoredTrack:aStoredTrack];
    [self setValue:stringRepresentation
            forKey:@"storedTrackObjectIDString"];

    [self didChangeValueForKey:@"storedTrack"];
}

AFStoredTracks are backed by the on-disk store. self is an NSManagedObject backed by the in-memory store.

This code worked perfectly well with the 10.6-and-earlier pattern. However, it's failing in the retrofitted code. For some reason, the AFStoredTrack objects that are being returned by the -storedTrack method are sometimes just empty shells (any retrieved attribute is just nil), and sometimes they throw up an exception saying that Core Data couldn't fulfill the fault.

What's weird is if I add this code to the -storedTrack method:

- (AFStoredTrack *)storedTrack;
{
    ...

    if (theStoredTrack == nil) {
        ...
    } else {
        if ([theStoredTrack isFault]) {
            NSManagedObjectContext *objectContext = [self managedObjectContext];
            NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *coordinator = [objectContext persistentStoreCoordinator];
            NSURL *objectURL = [NSURL URLWithString:IDString];
            NSManagedObjectID *storedTrackObjectID = [coordinator managedObjectIDForURIRepresentation:objectURL];

            NSError *retrieveError = nil;
            AFStoredTrack *testTrack = (AFStoredTrack *)[objectContext existingObjectWithID:storedTrackObjectID error:&retrieveError];
            NSLog(@"AFStoredTrack: %@",testTrack);
        }
    }
    ...
}

then the AFStoredTracks are logged with the proper data, rather than being null or throwing an exception. If you'll note, this is the exact same code used in the previous block to set the primitive storedTrack property in the first place. It doesn't seem to make any sense.

I've checked to make sure that the AFStoredTrack and the NSManagedObject it's being accessed from are using the same context, too. The on-disk data is all there in the SQLite file, just as it should be if the saves are happening as they should. I've even logged the stored URI of the AFStoredTrack objects, and they're valid -- the URIs from the first block and the second block show the same managed object URI, even though the first one gets bogus nil data or throws an exception, and the second gets the correct data.

[UPDATE: Err, I take that back, the NSManagedObject and its AFStoredTrack primitive attribute don't have the same NSManagedObjectContext:

- (AFStoredTrack *)storedTrack;
{
    ...

    if (theStoredTrack == nil) {
        ...
    } else {
        NSManagedObjectContext *storedTrackContext = [theStoredTrack managedObjectContext];
        NSManagedObjectContext *selfContext = [self managedObjectContext];
        if (storedTrackContext != selfContext) {
            NSLog(@"self context: %@, storedTrack context: %@",selfContext,storedTrackContext);
        }
        ...
    }
    ...
}

I'm getting log lines from this code snippet, and furthermore, storedTrackContext sometimes (but not always) logs itself as "(null)"! Huh?!? How can an NSManagedObject not have a context? That makes even less sense.

Maybe something's changed, and it's not possible (or harder) to have attributes with NSManagedObject primitive values?]

Anybody have an idea of what's going on?

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1 Answer 1

I save the contexts, and then the shared parent observes the NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotifications, but instead of merging the changes as before, I simply save the parent, thereby propagating the changes that way.

It's actually the other way around. Changes are propagated from child up to the parent context automatically on save. Child context does not automatically receive changes in the parent context. If you need up-to-date data on the child context, you need to refresh objects.

That is why UIManagedDocument uses parent context internally and exposes child context for developers.

Best regards,

sven.

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