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I have multiple line string that I'd like to replace, but don't understand why it's not working. For some reason, a period in the string stops the matching for the regular expression.

My string:

s = """
[some_previous_text]
<start>
one_period .
<end>
[some_text_after]
"""

What I'd like to end up with:

s = """
[some_previous_text]
foo
[some_text_after]
"""

What I initially tried, but it doesn't match anything:

>>> import re
>>> s = "<start>\none_period .\n<end>"
>>> print re.sub("<start>[^.]*<end>", "foo", s)
<start>
one_period .
<end>

However, when I took the period out, it worked fine:

>>> import re
>>> s = "<start>\nno_period\n<end>"
>>> print re.sub("<start>[^.]*<end>", "foo", s)
foo

Also, when I put an <end> tag before the period, it matched the first <end> tag:

>>> import re
>>> s = "<start>\n<end>\none_period .\n<end>"
>>> print re.sub("<start>[^.]*<end>", "foo", s)
foo
one_period .
<end>

So what's going on here? Why does the period stop the [^.]* matching?

EDIT:

SOLVED

I mistakenly thought that the carat ^ was for new-line matching. What I needed was a re.DOTALL flag (as indicated by Amber). Here's the expression I'm now using:

>>> import re
>>> s = "<start>\none_period .\n<end>"
>>> print re.sub("<start>.*<end>", "foo", s, flags=re.DOTALL)
foo
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why wouldn't it? [^.] is "the set of all characters that is not a ." and thus doesn't match periods.


Perhaps you instead meant to just put .* (any number of any characters) instead of [^.]*?

For matching across newlines, specify re.DOTALL:

re.sub("<start>.*<end>", "foo", s, flags=re.DOTALL)
share|improve this answer
    
if I use .*, though, it doesn't match anything (i.e. re.sub("<start>.*<end>", "foo", s)). What would be a correct substitution expression? –  user749618 Feb 10 '12 at 21:51
    
If you want . to match across lines, you need to use the re.DOTALL flag. docs.python.org/library/re.html#re.DOTALL –  Amber Feb 10 '12 at 21:53
    
re.sub("<start>.*<end>", "foo", s, flags=re.DOTALL) works! Thanks much. –  user749618 Feb 10 '12 at 21:54

Thats because [^.]* is a negated character class that matches any character but a period.

You probably want something like <start>.*?<end> together with the re.S modifier, that makes the dot matches also newline characters.

re.sub("<start>.*?<end>", "foo", s, flags=re.S)
share|improve this answer
    
So what would be the correct expression to use? –  user749618 Feb 10 '12 at 21:52
    
@user749618 I updated my answer. re.S is the same than re.DOTALL that Amber suggested. –  stema Feb 10 '12 at 21:55
    
Note that re.sub() only accepts the flags argument in Python 2.7 or Python 3.1+, before that you will either need to compile the regex with the flag set or use something like [\s\S]*? instead of .*?. –  Andrew Clark Feb 10 '12 at 21:57

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