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This is a Two (2) Part Question about Generics

I've got to create several similar classes to model similarly designed database tables.

All tables contain an ID int and a Text nvarchar(50) field. One or two may contain a few other fields.

I rarely use generics, but I see examples of it on here quite frequently. This is my largest attempt to create a generic class that is used in another generic class.

My basic construct is as follows, and I will point out with a comment what does not work and the error message Visual Studio 2010 is displaying:

public class IdText {

  public IdText(int id, string text) {
    ID = id;
    Text = text;
  }

  public int ID { get; private set; }

  public string Text { get; private set; }

}

public class TCollection<T> : IEnumerable<T> where T : IdText {

  private List<T> list;

  public TCollection() {
    list = new List<T>();
  }

  public void Add(int id, string text) {
    foreach (var item in list) {
      if (item.ID == id) {
        return;
      }
    }
    list.Add(new T(id, text)); // STOP HERE
    // Cannot create an instance of the variable type 'T'
    // because it does not have the new() constraint
  }

  public T this[int index] {
    get {
      if ((-1 < 0) && (index < list.Count)) {
        return list[index];
      }
      return null;
    }
  }

  public T Pull(int id) {
    foreach (var item in list) {
      if (item.ID == id) {
        return item;
      }
    }
    return null;
  }

  public T Pull(string status) {
    foreach (var item in list) {
      if (item.Text == status) {
        return item;
      }
    }
    return null;
  }

  #region IEnumerable<T> Members

  public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() {
    foreach (var item in list) yield return item;
  }

  #endregion

  #region IEnumerable Members

  System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
    return list.GetEnumerator();
  }

  #endregion

}

Visual Studio's IntelliSence wants me to add list.Add(T item), but I need to create this first.

I have attempted to re-write the offending line list.Add(new T(id, text)); as list.Add(new IdText(id, text));, but then I am reprimanded with the message "cannot convert from IdText to T".

How exactly do I get around this?

Next: When I go in to actually create a version of this IdText class later, I am not sure how exactly I can use this new class in the TCollection class I have designed for it.

For example, given this derived class:

public class ManufacturedPart : IdText {

  public ManufacturedPart(int id, string partNum, string description)
    : base(int id, string partNum) {
    Description = description;
  }

  public string Description { get; private set; }

}

...would I need to also derive a special version of TCollection to accompany it, like so?

public class ManufacturedParts<T> : IEnumerable<T> where T : ManufacturedPart {

  // OK, now I'm lost! Surely this can't be right!

}
share|improve this question
2  
Just a note that TCollection is probably a bad name for your collection class, since in C#, the T prefix is usually used for generic type arguments, not real types. (This is unlike, say, Delphi.) –  Daniel Pryden Feb 10 '12 at 22:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

1) You could use the new() constraint, make your properties public and add a parameterless constructor:

public class IdText
{
    public IdText()
    {
    }

    public IdText(int id, string text)
    {
        ID = id;
        Text = text;
    }

    public int ID { get; set; }

    public string Text { get; set; }

}

public class TCollection<T> : IEnumerable<T> where T : IdText, new()
{

    private List<T> list;

    public TCollection()
    {
        list = new List<T>();
    }

    public void Add(int id, string text)
    {
        foreach (var item in list)
        {
            if (item.ID == id)
            {
                return;
            }
        }
        list.Add(new T { ID = id, Text = text }); 
    }
}

2) You have multiple options:

If you want your collection to store any IdText (ManufacturedPart or anything else that derived from IdText):

TCollection<IdText> ss = new TCollection<IdText>();

The above, for now, can only store IdText as you instantiate objects in the Add(int, string) method, but if you provide a Add(T object) method, it could store any IdText instance.

If you want your collection to only contains ManufacturedParts:

public class ManufacturedParts<T> : TCollection<T> where T : ManufacturedPart, new()
{
     // Provide here some specific implementation related to ManufacturedParts
     // if you want. For example, a TotalPrice property if ManufacturedPart
     // has a Price property.
}

TCollection<ManufacturedPart> ss2 = new ManufacturedParts<ManufacturedPart>();

or even simpler, if your collection doesn't provide any additional method depending on the type of the stored objects:

TCollection<ManufacturedPart> ss2 = new TCollection<ManufacturedPart>();

Even simpler, if your goal is to only store objects, a custom collection isn't needed:

List<IdText> ss2 = new List<IdText>();  // Uses the built-in generic List<T> type
share|improve this answer

About the first question: c# doesn't support constructors with parameters as a generic constrain. Something you can do is replace it with

(T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T),new object[]{id,text});

By the other hand... you don't actually know how the constructors of the derived class will look like, so you can't ensure they will have that constructor.

About the second question, you can do this:

var collection = new TCollection<ManufacturedPart>();

in the same way List works.

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
This will fail when T is a subclass of IdText that doesn't have a matching constructor. –  recursive Feb 10 '12 at 23:00
    
Yep, that's what I said :) but, if he needs it that way, it can be defined by convention –  ivowiblo Feb 12 '12 at 4:22

If your collection class will be responsible for instantiating elements of its collected type, then you probably don't want to be using either the new() constraint or Activator.CreateInstance() -- as Jon Skeet has blogged, both of these exhibit poor performance.

It sounds like what you actually want is a provider delegate, like so:

public class MyCollection<T> : IEnumerable<T> where T : IdText {
    private readonly List<T> list;
    private readonly Func<int, string, T> provider;

    public MyCollection(Func<int, string, T> provider) {
        this.list = new List<T>();
        this.provider = provider;
    }

    public void Add(int id, string text) {
        list.Add(provider(id, text));
    }
}

And then you'd use it like:

var collection = new MyCollection((id, text) => new ManufacturedPart(id, text));

You can think of this as passing the specific constructor you want to use as an argument into the class, which it then uses to construct instances as needed.

And you don't need to create a separate subclass for MyCollection<ManufacturedPart> -- just use the generic class directly.

share|improve this answer
    
I am liking this more and more. How does that Jon Skeet character know so much? –  jp2code Feb 13 '12 at 17:40
    
Can't say I really understand how this whole Func<x, y> thing works, but I am using it in my code and it is performing flawlessly! Outstanding. –  jp2code Feb 15 '12 at 20:32
1  
@jp2code: Yeah, Jon Skeet is something of a legend around here. As far as the various Func delegates, they're just predefined generic delegate types defined in the standard library. Here's a simple lambda expression tutorial that might make it clearer to you; you might also want to start with the MSDN documentation on Anonymous Methods. –  Daniel Pryden Feb 15 '12 at 22:01

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