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I have windows 7 but I think it doesn't count, because the hook uses git shell. I tried to dump my database by commit with the following code, but it did not work.

#!/bin/sh
# Refresh the SQL schema file for inclusion within the git commit

# If something fails, exit with status other than 0
set -e

# select dump directory
    cd $(git rev-parse --show-toplevel)
    cd WebShop/DataBase

# first, remove our original schema
rm -f backup.sql

# generate a new schema
mysqldump -u root --password=root webshopdb > backup.sql

# Add the schema to the next commit
git add backup.sql

# Exit success
exit 0

I've got 2 error messages:

The path doesn't exist, because the space in a directory name breaks it.

    cd $(git rev-parse --show-toplevel)

Cannot find command

    mysqldump -u root --password=root webshopdb > backup.sql

Is it possible to fix it?

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news: I managed to get error messages from git bash (I tried first time with git gui, so I didn't get message) It says, that cd $(git rev-parse --show-toplevel) cannot found because there is a space character in one of the directory names contained by the path. :S And the mysqldump command cannot find neither. This will be a long day... :S –  inf3rno Feb 11 '12 at 0:49

4 Answers 4

I was trying to do this too, and came up with mixed results, but ultimately this does work. Maybe git has had a few updates since last year that fixed the problem? Maybe it's because I'm on a mac? Here's the pre-commit I use now. (Thanks to everyone's help)

#!/bin/sh

# Dump a fresh copy of the database
mysqldump -u root --password="password" myDB --skip-extended-insert > dump.sql
git add dump.sql

Note: The --skip-extended-insert is not necessary to make any changes to the bash, I just like the way my SQL dumps can be tracked in git with that extra option added.

what seemed to matter was how I was running the git command

If I ran git from the commandline, then there were no problems.

If I ran git via SourceTree, then there are errors unless SourceTree is run from the commandline too.

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If git is in your path in your .profile/.bash_profile etc you shouldn't need to set it. That said you are only "add"ing the file and not committing it. After you add you need to run

 git commit -m "updated schema"
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1  
Committing in a pre commit will result infinite loop don't you think? –  inf3rno Feb 11 '12 at 3:30

To debug sh, use

sh -x script

(comment set -e)

and you may source your rc file at the beginning to avoid using full paths :

source ~/.shrc
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That's too many information for me. :-) I don't know bash scripting, and don't call the commit from console, so if the sh -x script prints something out in the console, I won't see it. I was thinking about a log file, or so. Hmm I try it out with cmd.exe, and I'll create a .bat file from the code, maybe something good happens to me :D –  inf3rno Feb 10 '12 at 22:57
    
Have you tested with my 2th recommendation ? If you have no .shrc file, see if you have .bashrc one. sh -x can be ran by yourself to test your script in debug mode. –  stArdustͲ Feb 10 '12 at 23:09
    
I think the main problem is that I have windows, not linux... (If you think the opposite, please tell me :D) –  inf3rno Feb 10 '12 at 23:12
    
oO So it's not your own script, and you took it somewhere on the web and hope black magic ? Maybe you just need to install cygwin ? –  stArdustͲ Feb 10 '12 at 23:15
    
Yepp, that's a copy paste code. I don't understand the unix magic. :-) Hmm I try it out, but I'm afraid it won't help :S For example the comment in windows bash is :: etc... If I have to process the file with a cygwin.exe, than I have to use absolute path to it, and to give them the git path, etc... I think it cannot be done that way... –  inf3rno Feb 10 '12 at 23:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I fixed the errors, it creates the sql file, but still doesn't add it to the commit. I don't know why...

The fixed code:

#!/bin/sh
# Refresh the SQL schema file for inclusion within the git commit

# If something fails, exit with status other than 0
set -e

# select dump directory
cd "$(git rev-parse --show-toplevel)"

# first, remove our original schema
rm -f "WebShop\DataBase\backup.sql"

# generate a new schema
exec "C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.5\bin\mysqldump.exe" --skip-comments -u root --password=root webshopdb |sed 's$),($),\n($g' > "WebShop\DataBase\backup.sql"

# Add the schema to the next commit
git add "WebShop\DataBase\backup.sql"

# Exit success
exit 0
  • If we have whitespace in the path we have to use it between double quotes.
  • I used the exec and the full path of mysqldump.exe instead of the mysqldump command.
  • Made some changes by mysqldump options:
    • skip comments (to prevent file change caused by creation time footer)
    • split insert into multiple lines by sed
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If somebody says how to make the add working I'll accept that as an answer. –  inf3rno Feb 11 '12 at 4:24
    
A created a runnable file from this: stackoverflow.com/questions/9254186/… A don't know why the add wasn't working. It's in every tutorial I found. I'll try it with the --no-verify param asap. –  inf3rno Feb 15 '12 at 3:28

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