Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My application downloads content from a server, as soon as this has finished it parses its content any may also display it. If it displays it then a VC is pushed onto the navigation stack.

During the course of processing the content it may be necessary to schedule a local notification. When the notification fires a VC is also pushed onto the navigation stack to display something.

I have a problem where the local notification expires immediately - the problem is that in this situation the push of the 2nd VC is happening before the viewDidAppear: from the first VC push has executed.

I could detect if the notification is going to expire immediately and add a delay - but that seems not ideal (adding timers to solve problems is never a very good solution IMO, how much delay to add, what if its enough of a delay in most situations but not all, so make it longer to compensate, but then the pushing of the 2nd VC will be delayed possibly noticably etc. etc.).

When the notification(s) fires I could look to see if a VC has been pushed and if so if its viewDidAppear: has been called yet and if not hold off processing the notification(s) until it has.

This is doable but a small bit of messing to kept track of if/what stage the VC push is at. Is there a more elegant solution? I'd prefer to avoid having to add yet another queue to the app.

If there's not really any alternatives, what are options for the delaying of processing of the notifications? Could they actually be rescheduled with the OS for example so that they will execute in the next run loop (which should give the chance for viewDidAppear: to execute)?

Or is it necessary to use navigationController:didShowViewController:animated: and inspect and process a notification queue within there?

Any other options?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
can you clarify this moment?: "I have a problem where the local notification expires immediately - the problem is that in this situation the push of the 2nd VC is happening before the viewDidAppear: from the first VC push has executed." –  NeverBe Feb 10 '12 at 23:06
    
1) A VC gets pushed to the navigation stack 2)its viewWillAppear: is called 3) before its viewDidAppear gets called didReceiveLocalNotification: gets called 4) this results in another push of a VC being made to the navigation stack. This results in "Unbalanced calls to begin/end appearance transitions" / "nest push animation can result in corrupted navigation bar". I need to ensure the 2nd push of the VC does not occur until the viewDidAppear: from the push of the first VC has executed. The push of the 2nd VC results as a consequence of the local notification firing. –  Amino acids Feb 10 '12 at 23:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can try this

- (void)pushVC {
    @synchronized (self) {
        HomeViewController *vc = [[[HomeViewController alloc] init] autorelease];
        [self.navController pushViewController:vc animated:YES];
    }
}

- (void)processLocalNotification:(UILocalNotification *)notification {
    [self performSelector:@selector(pushVC) withObject:nil afterDelay:2.0f]; // delay for animation
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I tried with a delay and it worked, but as mentioned I would like to try to avoid delays if possible. But if this is the easiest way to handle thins may go for it. Why is the @synchronized necessary? If a few local notifications all fired simultaneously would this work in that situation also? –  Amino acids Feb 10 '12 at 23:35
    
just test it, add a few notifications with same fireDate –  NeverBe Feb 10 '12 at 23:38

Another way, check existing notifications, if new one is too close - just add some time

UIApplication *app = [UIApplication sharedApplication];
for (UILocalNotification *notification in [app scheduledLocalNotifications]) {

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.