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I have a program that looks something like this:

public partial class It
{
    static StreamWriter logging 
       = new StreamWriter(new FileStream(@"C:\log",FileMode.Create));

    void someFn()
    {
       logging.WriteLine("foo");
       logging.Flush();

       /// killed here in debugger with Shift+F5
    }
}

The problem it that the file doesn't end in "foo" and it seems the flush isn't happening. Am I abusing something here? I need a "the bits are in the file when I return" function, does such a thing exist?

Ideal would be that if I break at that point, another process will be bale to see that last line written.

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I can't reproduce it; if I run your code and break with the debugger after logging.Flush the file contains "foo". –  Fredrik Mörk May 28 '09 at 23:00
    
You say the file "doesn't end in foo" -- what does it end in? Is there any other code involved here (possibly on another thread)? –  Jonathan Rupp May 28 '09 at 23:05
    
It's ends in stuff logged before "foo": the end of the file is missing. And that is not the exact case I have. –  BCS May 28 '09 at 23:17
    
Can't reproduce as well. What framework version are you running? –  Badaro May 28 '09 at 23:37
    
I figured out the repro: the streams don't flush if I kill the app from under the debugger (Shift+F5) –  BCS May 29 '09 at 17:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I remember I got this problem too. I think you have to flush the underlying FileStream rather than the StreamWriter

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Fud :( that's going to be a pain. –  BCS May 28 '09 at 23:18
    
No, joy. didn't get what I need either. (I can't repro exactly what I described but it's still not working right) –  BCS May 28 '09 at 23:24
    
another thing you can try is to open & close the stream in the someFn rather than as a static variable. This will definitely force it to flush. –  oscarkuo May 28 '09 at 23:28
    
I think that was the most helpful. It turned into one of those "it works now so who cares" issues –  BCS Jun 18 '09 at 17:38

I think your code ought to work as you expect. I wonder if you have the build mode set to Release and/or there is a discrepancy between the source code you are seeing in the debugger and the code that is actually be executed. If the project is set to build in Release mode, the optimizer may be moving some code around and the source line that you are on may not represent exactly what is happening in the optimized code.

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I really hope that's not the kind of issue I'm getting... –  BCS May 28 '09 at 23:18

Can you, please, try this code and let us know results:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        StreamWriter foo = new StreamWriter(new FileStream(@"C:\foo.txt", FileMode.Create));
        foo.WriteLine("foo");

        StreamWriter bar = new StreamWriter(new FileStream(@"C:\bar.txt", FileMode.Create));
        bar.WriteLine("bar");
        bar.Flush();
    }
}
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