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Let's say someone gives you a class, Super, with the following constructors:

public class Super
{
    public Super();
    public Super(int arg);
    public Super(String arg);
    public Super(int[] arg);
}

And let's say you want to create a subclass Derived. How do you conditionally call a constructor in Super?

In other words, what is the "proper" way to make something like this work?

public class Derived extends Super
{
    public Derived(int arg)
    {
        if (some_condition_1)
            super();
        else if (some_condition_2)
            super("Hi!");
        else if (some_condition_3)
            super(new int[] { 5 });
        else
            super(arg);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
what are some examples of 'some_external_condition'? It seems like any such condition would have to be checked after super is called. –  ggreiner Feb 10 '12 at 23:09
    
@ggreiner: It doesn't have to be external, actually. I slightly changed the example. It could be simply based on the user's argument (which might more properly be an enum instead of an integer, but that's kinda unrelated). –  Mehrdad Feb 10 '12 at 23:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yeah, what @Johan Sjöberg said.

Also looks like your example is highly contrived. There's no magical answer which would clear this mess :)

Usually, if you have such a bunch of constructors it would be a good idea to refactor them as four separate classes (a class should be only responsible for one type of thing).

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Yeah, I don't know... it was a problem a friend of mine apparently ran into, not something I ran into. Totally agree with the third paragraph as well. +1 –  Mehrdad Feb 10 '12 at 23:21
1  
I have run into this problem in real code: writing backwards compatible code for android: LinearLayout has a different constructors depending on the value of android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT. –  Timmmm Nov 1 '12 at 11:18

Use static factories, and four private constructors.

class Foo {
 public static Foo makeFoo(arguments) {
    if (whatever) {
      return new Foo(args1);
    } else if (something else) {
      return new Foo(args2);
    }
    etc...
  }
  private Foo(constructor1) { 
    ...
  }
  ...
}
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super must be the first statement in a constructor, hence the logic in your sample is not valid.

The proper way is to create the same 4 constructors in your extending class. If you need validation logic you can use e.g., the builder pattern. You can also as suggested in the comments by @davidfrancis make all constructs private and supply a static factory method. E.g.,

public static Derived newInstance(int arg) {
      if (some condition) {
         return new Derived(arg);
      }
      // etc
}
share|improve this answer
    
How do you check the conditions then? –  Mehrdad Feb 10 '12 at 23:10
1  
@Merhdad, you leave that up to the class constructing the object. This can be e.g., a builder if you want to perform specific checks. –  Johan Sjöberg Feb 10 '12 at 23:11
    
OR have a static method on a class that takes a condition, inspects it and then instantiates and returns an instance of the class. "extra" constructors on Derived could be private in this case. This is not necessarily a way to go, just another recipe. –  Yuriy Zubarev Feb 10 '12 at 23:12
1  
I think you need to make all your constructors private and write a static factory method with your selection logic in it –  davidfrancis Feb 10 '12 at 23:13
    
@Yuriy: Yeah, I can come up with ways for working around it as well, but I'm looking for the "proper" solution, not just any solution. –  Mehrdad Feb 10 '12 at 23:14

Can't be done as such as super must be first statement in a constructor.

The proper alternative is a builder class and to have one constructor in the derived class for each constructor in the super class.

eg.

Derived d = new DerivedBuilder().setArg(1).createInstance();

public class DerivedBuilder {

    private int arg;

    // constructor, getters and setters for all needed parameters

    public Derived createInstance() {
        // use appropriate constructor based on parameters
        // calling additional setters if need be
    }
}
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You can't do that, but you can do this from the code that calls your class:

        if (some_condition_1)
            new Super();
        else if (some_condition_2)
            new Super("Hi!");
        else if (some_condition_3)
            new Super(new int[] { 5 });
        else
            new Super(arg);
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