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We need to index (in ASP.NET) all our records stored in a SQL Server table. That table has around 2M records with text (nvarchar) data too in each row.

Is it okay to fetch all records in one go as we need to index them (for search)? What is the other option (I want to avoid pagination)?

Note: I am not displaying these records, just need all of them in one go so that I can index them via a background thread.

Do I need to set any long time outs for my query? If yes, what is the most effective method for setting longer time outs if I am running the query from ASP.NET page?

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fetch them, you mean 'select * from table' ? Yes you can do that, and then you read them line by line from sql. Avoid to place them all in memory and then do actions. – Aristos Feb 10 '12 at 23:31
    
'Index' them how, for what purpose? I'm assuming that you don't mean like an SQL index, as you'd normally just tell the database manager to construct whatever indicies it thinks it needs... – Clockwork-Muse Feb 10 '12 at 23:32
    
@X-Zero I think the poster means to extract keywords from clob fields and "index" for searching the keywords aka store in a different table. – cotton.m Feb 10 '12 at 23:33
    
I am indexing them for Lucene – Rocky Singh Feb 10 '12 at 23:33
2  
Just dont fetch all the records into memory and then loop over them! You can use a SqlDataReader and yield each record to the Lucene index operation. Only fetch the columns that you actually need and avoid using an order by if possible. – Phil Bolduc Feb 11 '12 at 3:38

If I needed something like this, just thinking about it from the database side, I'd probably export it to a file. Then that file can get moved around pretty easily. Moving around data sets that large is a huge pain to all involved. You can use SSIS, sqlcmd or even bcp in a batch command to get it done.

Then, you just have to worry about what you're doing with it on the app side, no worries about locking & everything on the database side once you've exported it.

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I don't think a page is a good place for this regardless. There should be a different process or program that does this. On a related note maybe something like http://incubator.apache.org/lucene.net/ would help you?

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Is it okay to fetch all records in one go as we need to index them (for search)? What is the other option (I want to avoid pagination)?

Memory Management Issue / Performance Issue

You can face System Out Of Memory Exception in case you are bringing 2 millions of records As you will be keeping all those records in DataSet and the dataset memory will be in RAM.


Do I need to set any long time outs for my query? If yes, what is the most effective method for setting longer time outs if I am running the query from ASP.NET page?

using (System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand cmd = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand())
{
   cmd.CommandTimeout = 0;
}

Suggestion

  1. It's better to filter out the record from database level...
  2. Fetch all records from database and save it in a file. Access that file for any intermediate operations.
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What you describe in Extract Transform Load (ETL). there are 2 options I'm aware of:

  1. SSIS which is part of sql server
  2. Rhino.ETL

I prefer Rhino.Etl as it's comletely written in C#, you can create scripts in Boo and it's much easier to test and compose ETL Processes. And the library is built to handle large sets of data, so memory management is built in.

One final note: while asp.net might be the entry point to start the indexing process, I wouldn't run the process within asp.net as it could take minutes or hours depending on the amount of records and processing.

instead have asp.net be the entry point to fires off a background task to process the records. Ideally, completely independent of asp.net so you avoid any timeout or shutdown issues.

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Process your records in batches. You are going to have two main issues. (1) You need to index all of the existing records. (2) you will want to update the index with records that were added, updated or deleted. It might sound eaiser just to drop the index and recreate it, but it should be avoided if possible. Below is an example of processing the [Production].[TransactionHistory] from the AdventureWorks2008R2 database in batches of 10,000 records. It does not load all of the records into memory. Output on my local computer produces Processed 113443 records in 00:00:00.2282294. Obviously, this doesn't take into consideration remote computer and processing time for each record.

class Program
{
    private static string ConnectionString
    {
        get { return ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["db"].ConnectionString; }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int recordCount = 0;
        int lastId = -1;
        bool done = false;

        Stopwatch timer = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        do
        {
            done = true;

            IEnumerable<TransactionHistory> transactionDataRecords = GetTransactions(lastId, 10000);
            foreach (TransactionHistory transactionHistory in transactionDataRecords)
            {
                lastId = transactionHistory.TransactionId;
                done = false;
                recordCount++;
            }
        } while (!done);

        timer.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("Processed {0} records in {1}", recordCount, timer.Elapsed);
    }

    /// Get a new open connection
    private static SqlConnection GetOpenConnection()
    {
        SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString);
        connection.Open();
        return connection;
    }

    private static IEnumerable<TransactionHistory> GetTransactions(int lastTransactionId, int count)
    {
        const string sql = "SELECT TOP(@count) [TransactionID],[TransactionDate],[TransactionType] FROM [Production].[TransactionHistory] WHERE [TransactionID] > @LastTransactionId ORDER BY [TransactionID]";

        return GetData<TransactionHistory>((connection) =>
                                               {
                                                   SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, connection);
                                                   command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@count", count);
                                                   command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@LastTransactionId", lastTransactionId);
                                                   return command;
                                               }, DataRecordToTransactionHistory);
    }

    // funtion to convert a data record to the TransactionHistory object
    private static TransactionHistory DataRecordToTransactionHistory(IDataRecord record)
    {
        TransactionHistory transactionHistory = new TransactionHistory();
        transactionHistory.TransactionId = record.GetInt32(0);
        transactionHistory.TransactionDate = record.GetDateTime(1);
        transactionHistory.TransactionType = record.GetString(2);

        return transactionHistory;
    }

    private static IEnumerable<T> GetData<T>(Func<SqlConnection, SqlCommand> commandBuilder, Func<IDataRecord, T> dataFunc)
    {
        using (SqlConnection connection = GetOpenConnection())
        {
            using (SqlCommand command = commandBuilder(connection))
            {
                using (IDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    while (reader.Read())
                    {
                        T record = dataFunc(reader);
                        yield return record;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

public class TransactionHistory
{
    public int TransactionId { get; set; }
    public DateTime TransactionDate { get; set; }
    public string TransactionType { get; set; }
}
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