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Basically, I want a function I can call which lets me iterate in a bouncing-loop between a range of numbers by a specified increment. I've tried way complex solutions with many conditionals but it seems to me this should really be a simple math one-liner no?

I'm having a bit of trouble formulating my question so here is some pseudo coffescript to better explain my goals.

# Pseudo Coffeescript class

Class OscillatingIterator

    constructor: ( low, high, increment )->
        this.low = low
        this.high = high
        this.i = increment

    iter: ->
      ### can haz magical math code plz? ###

# Usage

oi = new OscillatingIterator( 1, 5 , 1 )

# outputs

oi.iter() #=> 1
oi.iter() #=> 2
oi.iter() #=> 3
oi.iter() #=> 4
oi.iter() #=> 5
oi.iter() #=> 4
oi.iter() #=> 3
oi.iter() #=> 2
oi.iter() #=> 1
oi.iter() #=> 2
oi.iter() #=> 3
oi.iter() #=> 4
oi.iter() #=> 5
oi.iter() #=> 4
oi.iter() #=> ...
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I'm starting to think conditionals ain't so bad after all. see: gist.github.com/1793937 –  Quickredfox Feb 11 '12 at 0:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've slightly modified the version written by ori. I think this is a kind of behavior that oscillator should have. Changing the sign of increment to bounce from the bound is only a part of what should be done, because it is good for step = 1 only. Example - oscillator between -2 and 3 with step 2. The code above will give -2, 0, 2, 0, -2, 0, 2 and so on.

I think it should be -2, 0, 2, 2 (1 step from 2 to 3 and 1 step to return), 0, -2, 0 and so on.. The same for (-4,4,3). It should be -4, -1, 2, 3, 0, -3, -1 and so on (the original code will give -4, -1, 2, -1, -4, ..). My suggestion is (I also added one more checkup for the values of the parameters)

function oscillator(low, high, inc) {

    // basic test for illegal parameters
    if (low > high || inc < 0 ||  2 * (high - low) < inc) 
        return function() { return NaN; };

    var curr = low;
    return function() {
        var ret = curr;
        curr += inc;

        if (curr > high || curr < low) 
        {   
            curr = inc>0 ? 2 * high - curr: 2 * low - curr;  
            inc = -inc;
        };

        return ret;
    }; 
}
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This answer indeed fixes some bugs I had encountered using Ori's functions. Thank you. –  Quickredfox Feb 13 '12 at 14:16

This function returns a function that implements the iterator for the requested parameters:

function oscillator(low, high, increment) {

    // basic test for illegal parameters
    if (low > high || increment < 0) 
        return function() { return NaN; };

    var curr = low;
    return function() {
        var ret = curr;
        curr += increment;

        // if the next number will exceed the boundaries, reverse the increment
        if (curr + increment > high || curr + increment < low) 
            increment = -increment;

        return ret;
    }; 
}
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This works. I've even tested with a negative to positive range (-9,9,1)... unless someone comes up with a magic modulo/sin/cos formula within a few I'll definitely mark this as the right answer. –  Quickredfox Feb 11 '12 at 1:15
1  
@Quickredfox sin or cos will not help here :) –  Cheery Feb 11 '12 at 7:18
    
After fiddling with this over the weekend, I tend to agree. –  Quickredfox Feb 13 '12 at 14:14

Like ori's except in CoffeeScript

createOscillator = (low, high, step = 1) ->
  value = low
  ->
    current = value
    value += step
    step *= -1 if value <= low or value >= high
    current

Usage

osc = createOscillator 0, 5, 1
console.log osc() for i in [0..10]

Prints

0
1
2
3
4
5
4
3
2
1
0

Edit: fixed bounds condition

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Seeing as Ori was first, i'll give him the answer but props to you now I can cut-and paste ;) –  Quickredfox Feb 11 '12 at 1:12

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