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I'm trying to learn how to create non-blocking applications in node.js but my code doesn't seem to be working.

nonblocking.js

var http = require('http');
var exec = require('child_process').exec;

var userRequests = 0;
http.createServer(function (request, response) {
    userRequests++;

    response.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});

    if( userRequests == 1 ){
        exec("node wait.js", function(){
            response.write('Thanks for waiting!');
            response.end();
        });
    }
    else{
        response.write('Hello!');
        response.end();
    }
}).listen(8080);

console.log('Server start');

wait.js

var startTime = new Date().getTime();
while (new Date().getTime() < startTime + 15000);
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What are you trying to do? What's the point of spawning a new process to wait, instead of a settimeout? What exactly is "not working?" Node is non-blocking by default, you kind of almost have to work harder to make it blocking. –  PuerkitoBio Feb 11 '12 at 1:37
    
Pretend wait.js is reading a large file or something. My understanding is if I didn't run this kind of operation in new process it would block my other incoming requests while it reads the file. –  Undefined Feb 11 '12 at 1:43
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

By definition, your example involves blocking logic. It may not be the main process that is blocking, but it still kind of defeats the purpose.

Node uses an event loop just like JavaScript in the browser. There are tons of available of resources all over the net for learning how JavaScript works.

I would recommend you take a look at these:

The key point is that everything in node is triggered by some kind of event. In the example code that you have posted, that event is the spawned process exiting. But you don't need to start a separate process to wait for 15 seconds. All of node's APIs are event driven, and time based events are actually part of JavaScript itself.

Here is an example of how you would write something like your example:

var http = require('http'),
    userRequests = 0;

http.createServer(function (request, response) {
  userRequests++;

  response.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});

  if( userRequests == 1 ){
    setTimeout(function(){
      response.write('Thanks for waiting!');
      response.end();
    }, 15000);
  }
  else{
    response.write('Hello!');
    response.end();
  }
}).listen(8080, function() {
  console.log('Server start');
});

You mentioned files in your comment. To send a file you would do this:

var http = require('http'),
    exec = require('child_process').exec,
    userRequests = 0;

http.createServer(function (request, response) {
  userRequests++;

  response.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});

  if( userRequests == 1 ){
    var stream = fs.createReadStream('./somefile.txt');
    stream.on('data', function(data) {
      response.write(data);
    });
    stream.on('end', function() {
      response.end();
    });
  }
  else{
    response.write('Hello!');
    response.end();
  }
}).listen(8080, function() {
  console.log('Server start');
});

In general, it's actually more straightforward because you would do this instead:

if( userRequests == 1 ){
  fs.createReadStream('./somefile.txt').pipe(response);
}

Node has a standard definition of a 'stream' which emits data and end events, among other things, and the 'pipe' method automatically handles binding the data and event handlers that I manually added in my example above.

As I said, start off by reading those articles. They are very useful and will get you headed in the right direction.

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