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I'm working on getting better with OOP in Python and I've run into some real hackishness in one program I'm writing. It works, but it's a mess.

Below is a short test example to illustrate. It creates cars of either 0, 2, or 4 windows into a list, and then compares the first element with the rest of the list.

The 3rd method of the first class shows what I'm worried about. I just want to be able to refer to whatever container that particular object is in without having to call it from the parameters each time. It isn't even that bad in this example, but what I'm working on has it in so many places that it's starting to get confusing.

    import random

    class Car:
            def __init__ (self, company, doors, id):
                    self.company = company
                    self.doors = doors
                    self.id = id

            def printDoors(self, id):
                    print 'Car ' + `self.id` + ' has ' + `self.doors` + ' doors.'

            def findSameDoors(self, id):
                    # these next lines are the ones that really bother me
                    companyAbstract = self.company + 's'
                    for i in eval(companyAbstract):
                            if self.id != i.id and self.doors == i.doors:
                                    print 'Car ' + `i.id` + ' does too!'

    class Company:
            def __init__ (self, types):
                    self.types = types

            def typesToNum(self):
                    result = []
                    for i in self.types:
                            if i == 'sedan':
                                    result.append(4)
                            elif i == 'convertible':
                                    result.append(2)
                            else:
                                    result.append(0)
                    return result


    porsche = Company(['sedan', 'convertible'])
    honda = Company(['sedan', 'convertible', 'motorcycle'])

    porsches = []
    for i in range(10):
            porsches.append(Car('porsche', random.choice(porsche.typesToNum()), i))

    hondas = []
    for i in range(10):
            hondas.append(Car('honda', random.choice(honda.typesToNum()), i))


    porsches[0].printDoors(0)
    porsches[0].findSameDoors(0)

Just in case it matters, Python 2.4.3 on RHEL. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Be cautious of using id as an identifier, as id() is a Python built-in. Also be cautious of cars with no windows! It's not really clear what you are trying to do here (what is the "container"?), but it looks like you are looking for inheritance... –  Johnsyweb Feb 11 '12 at 4:19
    
If you want more than the most obvious hints here, you might consider moving this to codereview.SE. There is lot to improve. –  Niklas B. Feb 11 '12 at 4:22
2  
I would argue that the operation of finding cars with the same doors is an operation on the collection and not the members of the collection. In general, I would avoid making objects overly aware of containers that they may be in. –  Kris R. Feb 11 '12 at 4:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I'm understanding your question right, you want to attach the list of cars to the company object:

import random

class Car:
    def __init__ (self, company, doors, id):
        self.company = company
        self.doors = doors
        self.id = id

    def printDoors(self, id):
        print 'Car ' + `self.id` + ' has ' + `self.doors` + ' doors.'

    def findSameDoors(self, id):
        for i in self.company.cars:
            if self.id != i.id and self.doors == i.doors:
                print 'Car ' + `i.id` + ' does too!'

class Company:
    def __init__ (self, types):
        self.types = types
        self.cars = []

    def typesToNum(self):
        result = []
        for i in self.types:
            if i == 'sedan':
                result.append(4)
            elif i == 'convertible':
                result.append(2)
            else:
                result.append(0)
        return result


porsche = Company(['sedan', 'convertible'])
honda = Company(['sedan', 'convertible', 'motorcycle'])

for i in range(10):
    porsche.cars.append(Car(porsche, random.choice(porsche.typesToNum()), i))

for i in range(10):
    honda.cars.append(Car(honda, random.choice(honda.typesToNum()), i))


porsche.cars[0].printDoors(0)
porsche.cars[0].findSameDoors(0)

There's more cleanup that could be done to it, but I think that should solve your immediate concern.

share|improve this answer
    
I think your only other option would be some hackery with the gc module, but I don't think that's in the spirit of what you're looking for. –  Mu Mind Feb 11 '12 at 4:24
    
Yeah, this is exactly what I'm looking for. Next next question was actually going to be how to join two types of objects together, but this does that and more. What do you even call it? I haven't seen the topic on any of the OOP research I've done. Anyway, thanks a ton! –  Ken Oh Feb 11 '12 at 4:27
1  
Not sure exactly what you mean by joining them together. I noticed you don't need to be passing id into each method and also typesToNum has a lot of room for improvement. If anything it should be a static method on Car, but it makes more sense to have the Car type know how many doors it has. Here's an improved version I whipped up: gist.github.com/1797426 –  Mu Mind Feb 11 '12 at 7:31
1  
Awesome. I've studied the new version and have internalized everything. My confusion about "joining" objects together and not just having one inherit from the other is the main part that I learned. I'm used to a lizard is a reptile is an animal kind of inheritance from class, but a bunch of cars isn't a company. However, this makes sense and I now see the mechanisms involved. Many thanks again! –  Ken Oh Feb 11 '12 at 20:33

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