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really new to JQuery.. like 2 hours new. Began to write a drop down menu for a login box like this: HTML:

<button id="loginButton">Login</button> 

When you hover over that, this JQuery runs:

$('#loginButton').live('hover', function() {
    login_drop();   
});

function login_drop(){
$('#loginBox').fadeIn();

}

$('#loginButton').live('hover', function() {
    login_away();

});

function login_away(){
$('#loginBox').fadeOut();
}

And then this HTML DIV appears directly under the button:

<div id="loginBox">                
<label for="email_B">Email Address</label>
<input type="text" name="email_B" id="email_B" />
<label for="password">Password</label>
<input type="password_B" name="password_B" id="password_B" />
<input type="submit" id="login" value="Sign in" />
<label for="checkbox"><input type="checkbox" id="checkbox" />Remember me</label>
<span><a href="#">Forgot your password?</a></span>
</div>

and the CSS on that DIV is this:

#loginBox {
    position:absolute;
    top:70px;
    right:100px;
    display:none;
 z-index:1;
}

This all works, but the behavior of it stinks. How do I make it so you can hover over the button put your mouse in the newly appeared DIV and the div won't fade away until your mouse leaves the div?

Sorry if my coding stinks. Thanks a bunch guys!

--------------------------------EDITS AKA the ANSWERS-------------------- So for all of you reading this down the line. There are so many ways of making this work depending on how you want the user to interact with it.

Here is way 1...This way the login box fades out when your mouse leaves the login button. This is a quick way fo making it work. This answer is thanks to elclanrs besure to Up 1 his answer below if you like this.

JQuery:

$(function(){
$('#loginButton').mouseenter(function(){ $('#loginBox').fadeIn(); }); 
$('#login').mouseout(function(){ $('#loginBox').fadeOut(); }); 
});

HTML:

<div id="loginBox">                
<label for="email_B">Email Address</label>
<input type="text" name="email_B" id="email_B" />
<label for="password">Password</label>
<input type="password_B" name="password_B" id="password_B" />
<input type="submit" id="login" value="Sign in" />
<label for="checkbox"><input type="checkbox" id="checkbox" />Remember me</label>
<span><a href="#">Forgot your password?</a></span>
</div>

CSS:

#loginBox {
position:absolute;
top:70px;
right:100px;
width:200px;
height:200px;
display:none;
z-index:99;
background:url(../images/162.png);
}

WAY 2 is adding is a cancel button like Jared Farrish did here: http://jsfiddle.net/j4Sj5/4/ if you like his answer, be sure to vot him up below!!

and WAY 3 is what I'm attempting now and should be the most user friendly and flashy. I'll post back once I get it to work correctly!

share|improve this question
    
JSFiddle demo: jsfiddle.net/j4Sj5 –  Jared Farrish Feb 11 '12 at 5:09
    
Mouseovers on a button element to show content are not a great UI design. I would say your design scheme is flawed due to this, and you should just show the form on click or some other recognizable behavior. –  Jared Farrish Feb 11 '12 at 5:11
    
Ohh snap! thanks man! –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:12
    
I have the id on an li element on a top menu. I just threw it on a button to make it easier for you guys to read. –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:13
    
You don't need to edit the answers into your question (in fact, you should not do this). If you have a better answer than the others, just answer your own question instead of editing. –  kapa Feb 11 '12 at 12:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT

(Subsequent EDIT: added a timeout to hide after only a mouseover on the show login element, plus some other updates.)

While I still think using mouseenter and mouseout to handle a login form is not the right way to go from a usability perspective, below is code that demonstrates what Jim Jeffers is describing and attempts to handle some of the pitfalls of the approach:

var setuplogindisplay = function(){
    var $loginbox = $('#loginBox'),
        $loginshow = $('#loginShow'),
        $logincontainer = $('#loginContainer'),
        $cancellogin = $('#cancelLogin'),
        keeptimeout,
        closetimeout;

    var keepDisplay = function(){
        clearAllTimeouts();
        keeptimeout = setTimeout(loginHide, 2000);
    };

    var loginDisplay = function(){
        clearAllTimeouts();
        if ($loginbox.is(':hidden')) {
            $loginbox.fadeIn();
        }
    };

    var loginHide = function(){
        clearAllTimeouts();
        if ($loginbox.is(':visible')) {
            if (!$(this).is('#cancelLogin')) {
                closetimeout = setTimeout(function(){
                    $loginbox.fadeOut();
                }, 1500);
            } else {
                $loginbox.fadeOut();
            }
        }
    };

    function clearAllTimeouts() {
        if (keeptimeout) {
            clearTimeout(keeptimeout);
        }
        if (closetimeout) {
            clearTimeout(closetimeout);
        }
    }

    $loginshow.mouseover(loginDisplay);
    $loginshow.mouseout(keepDisplay);
    $logincontainer
        .mouseout(loginHide)
        .children()
            .mouseover(loginDisplay)
            .mouseout(keepDisplay);
    $cancellogin.click(loginHide);
};

$(document).ready(setuplogindisplay);

http://jsfiddle.net/j4Sj5/19/

Note, you have to make concessions to handle the fact mouseouts will fire when you mouse over elements within the #logincontrol element. I handle this by having them loginDisplay() on mouseenter event (it will work on mouseout, but it makes more logical sense on mouseenter).


I would keep in mind usability of the form when trying to access it and try not to get too clever or over-engineer the user experience. Consider:

<input type="button" id="cancelLogin" value="Cancel" />

Use this to close/hide the form, not an action on another element. If you put the close form action on an event like mouseout, you're going to aggravate your users when they move the mouse accidentally or intentionally out of the way, only to find the login form was closed when they did so. The form, IMO, should have the control which fires the event to hide it according to the user's choice.

<span id="loginButton">Show Login</span>
<div id="loginBox">                
    <label for="email_B">Email Address</label>
    <input type="text" name="email_B" id="email_B" />
    <label for="password">Password</label>
    <input type="password_B" name="password_B" id="password_B" />
    <input type="submit" id="login" value="Sign in" />
    <input type="button" id="cancelLogin" value="Cancel" />
    <label for="checkbox"><input type="checkbox" id="checkbox" />Remember me</label>
    <span><a href="#">Forgot your password?</a></span>
</div>

$(document).ready(function(){
    var $loginbox = $('#loginBox'),
        $button = $('#loginButton'),
        $cancellogin = $('#cancelLogin');

    var loginDisplay = function(){
        $loginbox.fadeIn();
    };

    var loginHide = function(){
        $loginbox.fadeOut();
    };

    $button.click(loginDisplay);
    $cancellogin.click(loginHide);
});

http://jsfiddle.net/j4Sj5/4/

share|improve this answer
    
Just saw this now. –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:35
    
I like this alot. The cancel button makes sense. –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:39
    
If I were having to interact with something like this to access my account on a site, I'd be annoyed. –  Jared Farrish Feb 11 '12 at 5:42
1  
When I was looking at it, I realized I had not accounted for the fact that the mouseout will be fired once you hover over an element within the element with the mouseout event. So in other words, as soon as you mouse over one of the elements in the #loginBox element, the mouseout fires. See: jsfiddle.net/j4Sj5/10 for how I handled this and incorporated a setTimeout to adjust the loginHide() function so it's not quite so problematic. –  Jared Farrish Feb 11 '12 at 6:03
1  
@Silas - See my latest edit. One of the side effects of answering questions with real code is that it can be difficult to quickly spot problems in real time as you're providing it. I've fixed several little flaws with the timeout and whatnot; I believe this code should work, but if it doesn't, just let me know. –  Jared Farrish Feb 11 '12 at 6:17

Ah this is a great one to do yourself. Here's how to do it. First off, live might be overkill for what you need to do. In your case you can use a standard hover event handler in jQuery:

$('#loginButton').hover(function() {
  $('#loginBox').fadeIn();
}), function(){
  $('#loginBox').fadeOut();
});

The real trick here is that you will trigger the mouse out effect as soon as your mouse moves off the button. This will make the menu disappear when the mouse enters the login box!

So what you actually want to do is handle the hover effect on a containing element. Make sure your #loginButton and #loginBox are contained in a parent element like so:

<div id="loginControl">
   <button id="loginButton">Login</button> 
   <div id="loginBox">...</div>
</div>

Then attach the event to the loginButton's parent:

$('#loginButton').parent().hover(function() { ... }), function(){ ... });

Also, if you are using absolute positioning on #loginBox you'll want to also make sure you use position: relative on it's parent (#loginControl in my example):

#loginControl{ position: relative; }

Let me know if you have any trouble.

Getting More Advanced:

If you want to take this a step further you can try out implementing a simple timeout. I learned early on that it's bad for usability to have a dropdown menu that disappears when I accidentally moved my mouse off the dropdown. To fix this I add a simple delay that prevents the dropdown from hiding if the user's mouse returns to the dropdown within a very short period of time (say 250 to 350ms). I have this as a gist on github in case you want to try it out later: https://gist.github.com/71548

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to write this, reading it now! –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:40
    
This a great way of doing it. I understand it and the delay is a great idea. I didn't know you could add a delay. Trying this now. Going to see how user friendly I can make this. –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:46
    
If you have the #loginControl element already, why not use it instead of finding the parent of #loginButton? –  Jared Farrish Feb 11 '12 at 5:46
1  
@JaredFarrish correct you could use #loginControl directly. I was just showing how you could easily traverse in jQuery and thought it'd be easier to follow if I referenced the elements silas was already using as much as possible rather than the new one I added in my example. –  Jim Jeffers Feb 11 '12 at 6:07
1  
@Silas - glad it's working for ya! –  Jim Jeffers Feb 11 '12 at 6:09

Instead of reinventing the wheel, I would recommend looking into a jquery plugin like hoverintent. It does most of the work for you.

And, on a related note, .live() is being deprecated in jquery as of v1.8. you should instead use .on().

share|improve this answer
    
Mmm...jQuery 1.8? –  elclanrs Feb 11 '12 at 5:16
    
I'm sorry. I was reading through stuff and couldn't get the mouseenter to work, but I got the live function to work. Thanks for your help guys! –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:16

This should work. Plus you don't need live() which by the way is deprecated in favor on on(). You also don't need those functions for a simple fadeIn()/fadeOut():

$('#loginButton').mouseenter(function(){ $('#loginBox').fadeIn(); });
$('#loginBox').mouseout(function(){ $(this).fadeOut(); });
share|improve this answer
    
AWESOME! Yeah i saw the mouseenter and out on the JQuery website, I just didn't understand how to use it! thanks a bunchg man! –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:14
    
Glad it worked! Feel free to accept this as your answer. –  elclanrs Feb 11 '12 at 5:15
    
$(function(){ $('#loginButton').mouseenter(function(){ $('#loginBox').fadeIn(); }); $('#loginBox').mouseout(function(){ $(this).fadeOut(); }); }); Using it like this.. is that ok? –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:22
    
What do you mean "like this". You mean all in one line? –  elclanrs Feb 11 '12 at 5:24
    
I put this $(function(){ }); around it. It works great, thanks man! –  Silas Feb 11 '12 at 5:25

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