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So I'm working on a program where the function reads in from stdio, and keeps reading in characters in chunks of n characters.

So far I've gotten it so that everything is stored in a character array called buffer. For the next step, I need to sort each chunk of n characters. For example the string cats/ndogs/n should be split as cats/n dogs/n if n =5, and then qsort() needs to alphabetize it. This is how I'm calling qsort():

qsort (buffer, (line-2)*n*(sizeof(char)),n,compare);

Where (line-2)*n*sizeof(char) gives the total number of items in the array buffer; 10 in this case.

This is my compare function:

int compare (const void * a, const void * b)
{
   return (strcmp(*(char **)a, *(char **)b));
}

When I run this, however, I always get a seg fault in strcmp(). Any ideas why?


This is the loading code:

while (!feof(stdin))
{
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        char l = getchar();
        if (l != EOF)
        {
            if ((i == 0) && (line != 1))
            {
                success = (int *)realloc(buffer, line*n*(sizeof(char)));
            }
            buffer[(n*(line-1))+i] = l;
        }
     }
     line = line + 1;
}
share|improve this question
    
That loading code (which should really be in the question) looks highly broken; you need to use the return value of realloc(): it's your new buffer! –  unwind Feb 11 '12 at 14:59
    
Your char l = getchar(); is a minor disaster; getchar() returns an int, not a char. If characters are unsigned, the EOF test will never be true. If characters are signed, you will get a bogus EOF on reading character code 0xFF (often U+00FF, ÿ, LATIN SMALL LETTER Y WITH DIAERESIS or y-umlaut, used in Turkish in particular). It is good that you save the return value from realloc() in a new variable. It is bad that you do not check for memory allocation failure, and it is bad that you do not then use the new value in place of the old. Using realloc() can move your memory. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 11 '12 at 15:44
1  
1) what is line 2) your feof() usage is impractical 3) casting malloc() et.al is unwanted 4) realloc() a char pointer to an int pointer is magic! 5) what is succes? 6) sizeof(char) is 1, by definition. 7) what is buffer? 8) what Jonathan said about char and EOF. –  wildplasser Feb 11 '12 at 15:45
    
Your comparison function is correct for sorting an array of character pointers by comparing the strings that the pointers point at. The data structure you create in the reading code is not an array of character pointers - whatever else it is. Redesign your reading code and validate that you can echo back what you read safely. If you have valgrind, use it. Then think about sorting it. (Hint: allocate an array of character pointers; then for each line, allocate a new string.) –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 11 '12 at 15:48
    
My contribution solves his original problem, where all fixed-size elements live side by side in the buffer. –  wildplasser Feb 11 '12 at 15:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Silly question, but are your strings null terminated? You seem to only have a newline on the end.

Also, you probably only need "strcmp((char *)a, (char *)b)" as the extra *s look to be redundant to me.

share|improve this answer
    
they arent null terminiated, would I need to add a null terminator at the end of each n character to have strcmp work? so in this example I would have to make my buffer 12 characters long –  user1161080 Feb 11 '12 at 7:57
    
I don't know why you are complicating the strcmp function?? It should just be strcmp((char *)a,(char *)b) –  noMAD Feb 11 '12 at 8:00
    
Well, either null terminate them (so for "ABCDE" you need space for 6 chars) because strcmp will look for the first null in the two strings (hence the memory fault if there aren't any) OR maybe use strncmp, but you will need a global variable to specify the max length of the strings –  Simon F Feb 11 '12 at 8:01
2  
If you're doing any work on c-strings, they are assumed to be null terminated. If not, things blow up. –  Pochi Feb 11 '12 at 9:22
    
I changed by memcmp to be called like this, using the size as the third parameter, and I'm no longer getting a segmentation fault. But on the same time the function isnt doing anything, the contents of my array arent getting sorted.. –  user1161080 Feb 11 '12 at 16:46
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char buffer[] ="333000222555111777888666999444";

int mycmp(void *l, void*r);
int main(void)
{
/* note: sizeof buffer is 31,
** but the integer division will round down
** , ignoring the extra nul-byte */
qsort(buffer, (sizeof buffer/3), 3, mycmp);
printf ("[%s]\n", buffer);

return 0;
}

int mycmp(void *l, void *r)
{
return memcmp(l,r,3);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I changed by memcmp to be called like this, using the size as the third parameter, and I'm no longer getting a segmentation fault. But on the same time the function isnt doing anything, the contents of my array arent getting sorted.. –  user1161080 Feb 11 '12 at 16:45
    
The code I posted was only intended as a demonstration. Though your code is incomplete, there are more than one errors in it. Try to split the reading part and the sorting part, and build and debug them separately. –  wildplasser Feb 11 '12 at 18:06

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