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I have recently discovered existence of standard fastest type, mainly int_fast32_t and int_fast64_t.

I was always told that, for normal use on mainstream architecture, one should better use classical int & long which should always fit to the processor default reading capacity and so avoid useless numeric conversions.

In the C99 Standard, it says in §7.18.1.3p2 :

"The typedef name int_fastN_t designates the fastest signed integer type with a width of at least N. The typedef name uint_fastN_t designates the fastest unsigned integer type with a width of at least N."

And there is also a quote about it in §7.18.1.3p1 :

"The designated type is not guaranteed to be fastest for all purposes; if the implementation has no clear grounds for choosing one type over another, it will simply pick some integer type satisfying the signedness and width requirements."

It's unclear to me what fastest really means. I do not understand when I should use this type and when I should not.

I have googled a little on this and found that some open source projects have changed some of their functions to it, but not all of them. They didn't really explain why they have changed a part, and only a part, of their code to it.

Do you know what are the specific cases/usages when int_fastXX_t are really faster than the classical ones ?

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+1. I've been wondering about this for quite some time, and the C rationale is quiet on the topic. –  larsmans Feb 11 '12 at 11:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

In the C99 Standard, 7.18.1.3 Fastest minimum-width integer types.

(7.18.1.3p1) "Each of the following types designates an integer type that is usually fastest225) to operate with among all integer types that have at least the specified width."

225) "The designated type is not guaranteed to be fastest for all purposes; if the implementation has no clear grounds for choosing one type over another, it will simply pick some integer type satisfying the signedness and width requirements."

and

(7.18.1.3p2) "The typedef name int_fastN_t designates the fastest signed integer type with a width of at least N. The typedef name uint_fastN_t designates the fastest unsigned integer type with a width of at least N."

The types int_fastN_t and uint_fastN_t are counterparts to the exact-width integer types intN_t and uintN_t. The implementation guarantees that they take at least N bits, but the implementation can take more bits if it can perform optimization using larger types; it just guarantees they take at least N bits.

For example, on a 32-bit machine, uint_fast16_t could be defined as an unsigned int rather than as an unsigned short because working with types of machine word size would be more efficent.

Another reason of their existence is the exact-width integer types are optional in C but the fastest minimum-width integer types and the minimum-width integer types (int_leastN_t and uint_leastN_t) are required.

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This doesn't explain much. "on a 32-bit machine, uint_fast16_t could be defined as an unsigned int" -- yes, but you could use plain old unsigned int directly, since it's the native integer width and the standard guarantees it is at least 16 bits wide. Similarly, long meets about the same constraints as int_fast32_t. –  larsmans Feb 11 '12 at 11:15
    
I have read the rationale, but this does not say when it's faster, for what kind of specific usage ? If this is really faster everytime, why we do not use them by default ? –  Coren Feb 11 '12 at 11:23
2  
@larsmans uint_fast16_t could be an alias for unsigned int in a 32-bit machine and for unsigned long in a 64-bit machine. Using unsigned int instead of uint_fast16_t in your program will not be the same if you to intend to compile your program in different machines. –  ouah Feb 11 '12 at 11:24
    
@Coren this is a judgement up to the implementation, as the type could be fastest for one usage and not for another usage. –  ouah Feb 11 '12 at 11:27
    
Hmm, alright, +1. –  larsmans Feb 11 '12 at 11:34

There will probably not be a difference except on exotic hardware where int32_t and int16_t don't even exist.

In that case you might use int_least16_t to get the smallest type that can contain 16 bits. Could be important if you want to conserve space.

On the other hand, using int_fast16_t might get you another type, larger than int_least16_t but possibly faster for "typical" integer use. The implementation will have to consider what is faster and what is typical. Perhaps this is obvious for some special purpose hardware?

On most common machines these 16-bit types will all be a typedef for short, and you don't have to bother.

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Gnu libc defines {int,uint}_fast{16,32}_t as 64-bit when compiling for 64-bit CPUs and 32-bit otherwise. Operations on 64-bit integers are faster on Intel and AMD 64-bit x86 CPUs than the same operations on 32-bit integers.

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Yes, but shouldn't int be 64-bit on such a machine? –  potrzebie Oct 13 at 10:03
    
No, int can be as small as 16 bits, and its size usually depends on the compiler but not on the platform. This is probably an artifact of the 16- to 32-bit transition. –  user833771 Nov 3 at 8:50

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