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total_byte_len = 954
part_size_limit = 250

Result: #[star_byte, end_byte, bytes_in_part] with 0-based index
[[0, 250, 250], [251, 501, 250], [501, 751, 250], [751, 953, 202]]

I already have a function but it's very crude and unreliable (quick-n-dirty), and it's about 15 lines so I'd love to see what list-comprehension/or lambda can do here =)

If you guys insist, here is my version: Please note, I didn't give this much thought at the time, just something that will work ASAP. :) Deprecation notice!: <==

    def to_json(value):
        return json.dumps(value)

    def getByteRanges(total_byte_len, part_size_limit):

        if total_byte_len%part_size_limit == 0: #devides evenly
            left_over_part = 0
        else:
            left_over_part = 1

        how_many_parts = roundup(((total_byte_len-(total_byte_len%part_size_limit))/part_size_limit)+left_over_part)
        part_size = int(((total_byte_len-(total_byte_len%part_size_limit))/(how_many_parts-left_over_part))) #-1 to not include last part

        parts = [x for x in range(how_many_parts)]

        ranges = []
        for i, obj in enumerate(parts):
            start_range = (part_size*i)+1
            end_range = part_size*(i+1)+1

            if i == 0: #first part
                start_range = 0
                end_range = part_size

            if i == len(parts)-1: #last part
                end_range = total_byte_len-1

            ranges.append([int(start_range), int(end_range), (int(end_range)-int(start_range))])

        return ranges
share|improve this question
1  
shouldn't it be 250,499 and 500,749 and 750,953? –  KillianDS Feb 11 '12 at 11:20
2  
You should include your version of that function. –  Dan D. Feb 11 '12 at 11:22
    
@DanD. it's too quick-dirty, I shouldn't. It's just got redundancy, etc. and won't benefit anyone (well, if there is a good answer ;) –  ofko Feb 11 '12 at 11:30
    
what's with the negative vote (didn't like the func huh? lol) –  ofko Feb 11 '12 at 11:43
    
sum([250, 249, 249, 202]) != 954 print True –  kev Feb 11 '12 at 11:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A verbose, but readable version:

s = []
for p in range(0, total_byte_len, part_size_limit):
    last = min(total_byte_len - 1, p + part_size_limit - 1)
    s.append([p, last, last - p + 1])
share|improve this answer
    
I think I like this one, it's very clear. I wouldn't call this verbose lol, what do you call mine then - have mercy –  ofko Feb 11 '12 at 12:08

Your output is not right, because sum([250, 249, 249, 202]) != 954.

$ python3
>>> def fun(x, y):
...     f= lambda i: y if (x-i)>=y else x%y
...     return [[i, i+f(i)-1, f(i)] for i in range(0, x, y)]
...
>>> fun(954, 250)
[[0, 249, 250], [250, 499, 250], [500, 749, 250], [750, 953, 204]]
share|improve this answer

Yor example is a bit off (second part has 251 bytes), but something like this works:

[[x, y - 1, y - x] for x in range(0,total_byte_len, part_size_limit) for y in [min(x + part_size_limit, total_byte_len)]]

also you should probably create a list of tuples.

share|improve this answer
    
yea, at the time, the end-range of the last part could be left empty because the server I was calling accepted so I didn't try to be precice. –  ofko Feb 11 '12 at 12:05

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