Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Here is an abstract JavaScript code sample that illustrates the situation that is causing me to ask a question here:

function className (){    
    var private_variable = 0;        
    function privateMethod(){
        // Some irrelevant code.
    };    
    this.privilegedMethod = function (){
        // Some relevant code to determine if private variable needs to be modified.
        private_variable+=val;    // Modifies private variable.
    };    
    this.init = function () {
        $(window).keydown(function (key) {
            if (key.which == 13) {
                privateMethod();    // Call to private method works fine.
                this.privilegedMethod();    // 'this' references Window object,
                                            // not this class method as expected.
            }
        });
    };  
};

My question is - is there an alternative way I can make call this.privilegedMethod() reference to it's class, not the Window object which it is applied to?

Or perhaps any suggestions how I could restructure my code keeping the functionality -- key events are listened globally, the method of modifying the private variable is accessible outside the class, but private variable itself is not.

P.S. Placing the call to the privileged method inside the private did not change anything.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted
this.init = function () {
    var that = this;
    $(window).keydown(function (key) {
        if (key.which == 13) {
            privateMethod();
            that.privilegedMethod();
        }
    });
};  

or

this.init = function () {
    $(window).keydown($.proxy(function (key) {
        if (key.which == 13) {
            privateMethod();
            this.privilegedMethod();
        }
    }, this));
};  
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the fast response; works like a charm. – user1203684 Feb 11 '12 at 12:45
    
Please mark him as Answered if he answered your question – Paul Feb 11 '12 at 12:50
1  
I think "self" is a better name for variables used in this way, as it is what some other languages use instead of "this" and so more synonymous. – Kevin Reid Feb 11 '12 at 12:52
1  
Using self could also lead to confusion for the same reason, as people new to JS might think it's an actual keyword. – James McLaughlin Feb 11 '12 at 13:11
function className (){    
    var private_variable = 0;        
    function privateMethod(){
        // Some irrelevant code.
    };    
    this.privilegedMethod = function (){
        // Some relevant code to determine if private variable needs to be modified.
        private_variable+=val;    // Modifies private variable.
    };    

    this.init = function () {
        var handle = $.proxy(this.privilegedMethod, this);
        $(window).keydown(function (key) {
            if (key.which == 13) {
                privateMethod();    
                handle();                                                 
            }
        });
    };  
};

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.proxy/

share|improve this answer

The deal is that inside the keydown handler the scope is the window object, so the "this" keyword refers to the window which does not have you method.

James solution should work fine.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.