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I have this function;

static public void Print(Object[] arr) {
    for(int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
        System.out.println(i + " => " + arr[i]);
}

I want to use that for every primitive type array. Isn't there any way to do that without overriding it for every primitive type?

Note: This is just an example function. I want to know the technique if there is one.

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1  
You cannot do this for primitives. If your design allows it I would highly recommend you use the object versions instead. –  Perception Feb 11 '12 at 13:03
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, this is not possible. Array element types are not wrapped, Object[] formal parameter is not applicable for e.g. int[] actual parameter. You have to write one method per primitive type, as in java.util.Arrays. Ugly, but the only way.

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Primitive arrays are Objects in java, so you could use Object-type as the parameter (note, not an array of Objects, but just Object). The problem is, you'd still need to cast it to correct type to be able to iterate the array.

public class ArrayTest
{
    public void paramTest(Object args)
    {       
        if(args instanceof int[])
        {
            System.out.println("int-array");
        }

        if(args instanceof float[])
        {
            System.out.println("float-array");
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void test()
    {
        paramTest(new int[5]);
        paramTest(new float[5]);
    }
}

Output:

int-array
float-array
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Yes, that's called generics. Generics are - like templates in c++ - a variable type.

Take a look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generics_in_Java

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Thanks. That worked for me; static public <E extends Object> void Print(E[] arr) –  m_poorUser Feb 11 '12 at 13:28
    
It... does? What Java version? Could you show the calling code, please? From the linked wiki page: "public <T> T[] toArray(T... elements) { return elements; } In such cases you can't use native types either, ex: Integer[] array = toArray(1,2,3,4,5);" - I get a "not applicable" for int[] and that signature. –  Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Feb 11 '12 at 13:33
    
Oh sorry, it's not working with int[] type parameter, only Integer[]. You are right. I can't change whole struct for that. I think it's not possible. –  m_poorUser Feb 11 '12 at 13:34
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You can use Java generics like this to achieve what you want, here Number is java.lang.Number:

public static <T extends Number> void print(T[] arr)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
    {
        System.out.println(i + " => " + arr[i]);
    }
}

But this will work only for array of Primitive wrapper classes and not for Primitive arrays.

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3  
This won't work if you try to pass in a 'raw' primitive array, like calling print(new float[5]) -> 'not applicable for the arguments (float[])'. Primitive arrays are not autoboxed. –  esaj Feb 11 '12 at 13:19
    
@esaj, Agreed. Updated my answer by mentioning this. Thanks. –  Kuldeep Jain Feb 11 '12 at 13:46
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