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Very simple question, is it possible to make a variable that is retrieved from outside of a class, 'global' to the whole class so that I do not have to call the 'global $variable' at the beginning of each method?

This is what I am currently doing:

class test{
    public function testing(){
        global $globalVariable,

        // Do something
    }
    public function testing_two(){
        global $globalVariable,

        // Do something
    }
}

In other words, can I import variables into the construct function and therefore make them accessible to the entire class without having to call 'global' for each method?

UPDATE

Not sure if I have made it too clear with what I would like to achieve. Please see below:

$globalVariable = 'hello';

class test{
    public function testing(){
        global $globalVariable,

        // Do something
    }
    public function testing_two(){
        global $globalVariable,

        // Do something
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
Just pass it as parameter to the constructor function and assign it to a private property. –  Felix Kling Feb 11 '12 at 13:48
1  
@FelixKling this will break if he needs a really global variable, in the sense of it being changed outside the class. Global database connection resources come to mind. –  Eugen Rieck Feb 11 '12 at 14:01
2  
@Eugen: Global variables are a bad design decision anyways IMHO. Code gets more difficult to maintain and refactor if it grows. –  Felix Kling Feb 11 '12 at 14:13
1  
@Ben: Why are they global? Are you changing the database connection during the runtime of the script? Why not pass it as parameter to the constructor (dependency injection). There are many design patterns to avoid global variables (for a good reason). –  Felix Kling Feb 11 '12 at 14:15
1  
@BenCarey: You are awfully wrong. Continue to do so and you will learn the hard way. –  hakre Feb 11 '12 at 14:20
show 14 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To clear up how to do it:

You most likely to something like this include('database.php');. At that very point everything you included there is global to your script. Now if you have a class like the above you add a constructor:

class testclass
{
    private $db;

    public function __construct($db)
    {
       $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function yourmethod()
    {
       $this->db->prepare(); // And so on
    }
}

Let's assume your global variable is called $db in the global scope. You can just construct your object now using new testclass($db);. When you now use $this->db in all your methods there is no need to use the global statement.

share|improve this answer
    
THANK YOU!! This is exactly what I was looking for, all I wanted was confirmation. Out of interest, what is the benefit (point), of a reference? –  Ben Carey Feb 11 '12 at 14:34
1  
The approach above has several benefits. Firstly it makes your code clearer. Everyone inspecting the class from your documentation now sees that this class depends on a database object passed to it. Additionally you can define an interface for your connection and pass different types of connections into the class as long as they implement the interface. This also helps if you want to test your code at a later point. That way you can simply exchange objects. Overall it's much better to oversee everything because you don't rely on the global state being the way you need it in your class. –  Dan Feb 11 '12 at 14:50
    
Perfect, thank you very much @dan. –  Ben Carey Feb 11 '12 at 14:53
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Just use a reference:

class test{
    private $myvar;

    //use __ or old syntax to your liking
    function test() {
        global $globalVariable;
        $myvar =& $globalVariable;
    }

    public function testing(){
        //Use $this->myvar

        // Do something
    }
    public function testing_two(){
        //USe $this->myvar

        // Do something
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
References are deprecated aren't they? –  Ben Carey Feb 11 '12 at 14:08
    
@BenCarey: Definitely not. However what you try to achieve looks specifically wrong and you should revise what you want to do, because there must be something better. –  hakre Feb 11 '12 at 14:18
    
@Ben: No, they are not. Passing references at call time is deprecated: php.net/manual/en/language.references.pass.php –  Felix Kling Feb 11 '12 at 14:18
1  
IMHO the verdict is still waaaay out, if this feature will disappear: I personally think of it as an important part of the language, and that removing it would be a crippelning move. Others might agree or disagree. (Talking of references, not passing references!) –  Eugen Rieck Feb 11 '12 at 14:22
    
Ah, I was under the impression that they were, apologies. I am pretty sure that this answer is exactly what I am looking for. However, could I not just forget the reference and call 'global $globalVariable' in the construct, and then just use $globalVariable around the methods? –  Ben Carey Feb 11 '12 at 14:29
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Pass that variable as a property of the class

class test
{
    private $globalVariable = '';

    public function testing()
    {
        $this->globalVariable = 'set-som-value';
    }

    public function testing_two()
    {
        $this->globalVariable = 'Do Extra Work';
    }
}

and you can change the variable visibility with the words private public and protected where, private make the variable accesible only into that class, protected, makes the variable available in classes that extends that particular class, and public make tha variable accessible from everywhere

Global outside the class

global $globalVar;
$globalVar = 'SomeVal';

class test
{
    public function testing()
    {
        global $globalVar;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your advice but I didn't explain in enough detail what I am trying to achieve. The '$globalVariable' is defined outside of the class so the above answer is not relevant. My fault, apologies. –  Ben Carey Feb 11 '12 at 14:17
1  
Again, that is not what I am looking for. I do not want to call 'global' for each method. I want the variable to be accessible to the whole class. See @dan's answer –  Ben Carey Feb 11 '12 at 14:35
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