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I want to see when exactly a thread from the pool is brought into play and when it is freed.

What I want is to explore the behaviour of a third party library in order to decide whether I should bother with its async methods. If these methods block threads from the common pool then using of them wouldn't provide any benefits for ASP.NET apps. The library is obfuscated, so I don't want to search for an answer with a decompiler.

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If you're hoping for an event or a public hook of some kind that will tell you what the ThreadPool threads are doing, unfortunately there is no such thing.

I can think of two other approaches that might help:

First, you can check the value of the workerThreads result from ThreadPool.GetAvailableThreads(), before and after calling into your library. If the value changes, the library may be the culprit. This is most likely to be meaningful in a test environment where you're only processing a single request. You can also save the workerThreads number in a custom Windows performance counter, and track it over time -- perhaps using it to compare one approach vs. the other.

Here's a link to an article that describes the performance counter approach:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff650682.aspx

If you're using IIS 7+, another possibility is to disable MaxConcurrentRequestsPerCPU (via HostingEnvironment in .NET 4.0+, or via the aspnet.config file in .NET 3.5 or later) by setting it to zero, and set MaxConcurrentThreadsPerCPU to a relatively small number, and measure the performance of your app under load, using one interface in your library vs. the other. If requests are getting queued due to not having enough threads, response times will jump accordingly. The details of how to do this and what measurements to make unfortunately depend on the structure of your library and web requests.

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The way you ask the question is like you won a debugger that monitor your program.

Now inside your program you know when you call a thread from the pool and when you release it - don't you ?

If you do not control the program, you won to see and trace other programs then its sound like a general debugger. This maybe can be done by hook functions using c/c++ and a lot of code.

The process explorer from sysinternals can give you the open threads on real time, if you click on pool and see the properties.

From the other hand I think that ThreadPool.GetAvailableThreads can give you the information's you ask, at the moment that you needed.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.threadpool.getavailablethreads.aspx

If you can give some more information's on what you really try to archive and narrow your question, from a general debug program to a more targeted need.

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"Now inside your program you know when you call a thread from the pool and when you release it - don't you ?" - No, I don't! Because my program uses third party libraries. –  thorn Feb 14 '12 at 14:42
    
@thorn then you need a debugger for this libraries ? Its a special point that make your problems ? what are you try to solve here ? –  Aristos Feb 14 '12 at 14:44
    
What I want is to explore the behaviour of a third party library in order to decide whether should I bother with its async methods. If these methods block threads from the common pool then using of them wouldn't provide any benefits for ASP.NET apps. The library is obfuscated, so I don't want to search for an answer with a decompiler. –  thorn Feb 14 '12 at 14:56
    
@thorn I understand what you mean, but actually you ask for a debugger, a hook to the very deep... this lib even if it is obfuscated you can locate the points that open pool threads (if they are). Or you can call the GetAvailableThreads from start to the end of your page and get the different. –  Aristos Feb 14 '12 at 15:46
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