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I have two git working directories. As sometimes happens, I've made some changes in the wrong directory and would like to move those to the other one now. That is, I would like to merge/pull the uncommitted changes from one place to the other.

In bzr I would use merge with the --uncommitted option, but I've been unable to find a git equivalent.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pushing and pulling inherently works on commits, so I don't think there's any way to do that, specifically.

However, you could just create a temporary branch (git checkout -b tmp), commit to that, pull it to the other repository (git pull $OTHER tmp) and then either continue from that commit, or revert HEAD to the latest commit while keeping the changes to the working tree (git reset HEAD^) and go on working on them that way.

Edit: Perhaps even more importantly, however: Are you sure you want to have two separate working directories? I can see that being useful in e.g. Mercurial or SVN (I haven't used Bazaar, so I can't speak for it), but in Git, you would normally use branches and stashes instead.

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This approach works. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 11 '12 at 15:52
    
And yes, I want two directories. I have to actively work on both branches. Git doesn't concern itself with the binaries/build outputs, thus using checkout doesn't actually completely switch to the other branch (would leave outputs untouched). Sure, cmake/automake would rebuild as appropriate, but I don't want to wait. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 11 '12 at 15:58

A low-tech solution is simply to use git diff:

$ cd wd_1
$ (cd ../wd_2 ; git diff -p) | patch -p1

You can the git reset in the other working directory.

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