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I know that for Intel the vector registers are optimized e.g. the SandyBridge microarchitecture (SSE+AVX), but how about for NVIDIA's GPU?

Some sources I read somewhere (I forgot where) stated that using vector registers is useless for NVIDIA's GPU.. However I had a testrun running a program with vector registers on the GPU, and comparing to the one w/out them, they did gave me apx. 1.7x speedup.

FYI Intel's CPU only gives 1.25x speedup with for the same program.

So if NVIDIA does optimize those vector registers, could someone please give me an explanation or source to read? I need it for the documentation. Thanks.

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The likely source of performance improvement on an NVIDIA GPU will be in memory throughput. The hardware can do stores and loads for 64 and 128 bit types in a single transaction on each multiprocessor, which reduces overall latency and increases effective throughput. –  talonmies Feb 11 '12 at 16:14
    
Thanks for the reply. You mean the 16 load/store units? Can each unit load/store 128-bit types per warp? (hence makes it 16x128). If not, I think that is not the case.. Because implicit vector register usage (convert_floatn, vloadn, etc..) does make a difference.. It gives better speedup. –  ardiyu07 Feb 12 '12 at 1:29
    
Yes. The hardware can process 256 and 512 byte transaction sizes per warp. This can result in higher bandwidth utilisation at any given level of occupancy. See around slide 35 of these slides(note pdf) for a memcpy kernel example in CUDA which illustrates the effect. –  talonmies Feb 12 '12 at 7:45
    
awesome! thanks for your help and the reference! this is exactly what i need –  ardiyu07 Feb 12 '12 at 9:46
    
OK, I will make an answer out of my comments, if you would care to accept it. –  talonmies Feb 12 '12 at 10:04

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The likely source of performance improvement on an NVIDIA GPU will be in memory throughput. The hardware can do stores and loads for 64 and 128 bit types in a single transaction on each multiprocessor, which reduces overall latency and increases effective throughput. The hardware can process 256 and 512 byte transaction sizes per warp, so a suitably aligned float4 load/store request for a warp can be serviced in a single transaction, and a float8 load/store request in two transactions. This can result in higher global memory bandwidth utilisation at any given level of occupancy. See around slide 35 of this presentation by Vasily Volkov from UC Berkeley for a memcpy kernel example in CUDA which illustrates the effect of type size (and resulting transactions sizes) on memory throughput.

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Do you suggest that the GPU is actually not using SIMD instructions on float4/... for computations? –  eudoxos Feb 12 '12 at 10:11
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@eudoxos: The ALUs on NVIDIA's DX10/DX11 hardware (those which can run CUDA and OpenCL) don't have SIMD arithmetic instructions for operating on vector types like float4. They are purely scalar devices. The only operations which can be directly performed on vector types are load/store and filtering via the texture hardware. –  talonmies Feb 12 '12 at 12:30

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