Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't understand why with /u modifier \w doesn't work, and we have to change our regex. Not to talk about \b.

So anyone know if on a new version (maybe php 6?) \w will become the same as \p{L} with /u ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Nobody knows what changes PHP 6 will have (or if it ever iwill be released) –  Mchl Feb 11 '12 at 16:32
1  
Which are all this difficulties with unicode for php? –  dynamic Feb 11 '12 at 16:34
1  
Yes. One of the reasons why PHP 6 development was put on hold indefinitely was trouble with making it 100% unicode compatible. –  Mchl Feb 11 '12 at 16:37
1  
That, and also there's surprisingly small amount of people developing PHP (as contrasted to masses developing in PHP) –  Mchl Feb 11 '12 at 16:49
4  
However, despite the fact that it's such fun to criticise PHP, the \p{L} and /u issues is nothing to do with PHP, and everything to do with the PCRE library... PHP simply uses the PCRE library, in the same way as Perl or Python or Ruby or many other languages, and all suffer the same limitation –  Mark Baker Feb 11 '12 at 18:22

1 Answer 1

\w differs with locales, and as such, it is actually handy NOT to capture strange runes or hieroglyphs in some cases, in favor of only characters considered word characters in the desired locale. \w & \p{L} are functionally totally different. Configuring locales is what people should be more aware of. Use the right tool for the job, and not a sledgehammer to hammer a 1-inch nail, which substituting \w for \p{L} would be. A lot of existing functionality would break if they did change it. Also, this is entirely unrelated to the ongoing effort of making PHP unicode compatible.

share|improve this answer
    
are you sure? If you set locale to utf-8 \w will not match some utf8 chars –  dynamic Feb 23 '12 at 0:45
    
What do you mean set your locale to utf-8? utf-8 is a character set that can be used for a locale, not a locale. What is the actual locale you are using (de_DE.utf-8 for example), and what character is giving you problems? –  Wrikken Feb 23 '12 at 13:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.