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I'm trying to create a shell script that runs a command and plays music if the output of running the other script is nonempty. So far, I have this. However, I keep getting "Unexpected operator" errors on the last line. What is the issue with the code?

As an additional note, I've verified that myscript works fine, and running vlc from the command-line like that works as well.

#!/bin/sh

TOF=`myscript | cat`
EMPTYSTR=""

if [ "$TOF" == "$EMPTYSTR" ]; then
    echo "vlc somemusicfile.mp3"
fi
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Can you echo "$TOF"? –  kev Feb 11 '12 at 17:09
    
yes. I think the problem was that I used == to compare two strings instead of =. –  eqb Feb 11 '12 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Testing for string equality works using =. (As a matter of fact, equality is wrong here. You'd want to use inequality). However, you could simply use -n "$TOF" to check for a non-empty string.

Also, using |cat is unnecessary.

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Yes, that's it, bash works with both = and == and this is what I missed. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Feb 11 '12 at 17:04
    
At least on Debian-based systems, /bin/sh is symlinked to dash, which will fail the way the OP described when using ==. –  fnl Feb 11 '12 at 17:07
    
Yes, @fnl, that's what I meant. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Feb 11 '12 at 17:14
    
This solved it :) Thanks all! –  eqb Feb 11 '12 at 17:15
test -z "$(myscript)" || echo "vlc somemusicfile.mp3"

(though I don't know what's wrong with your code, maybe I'm missing some bashism, you can try changing #!/bin/sh to #!/bin/bash).

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returns nothing –  eqb Feb 11 '12 at 17:05
    
Do you want something for empty or non-empty result? If it is empty, like in your code and not as in your prose, then change || to &&. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Feb 11 '12 at 17:14

try:

#!/bin/sh

TOF=`myscript | cat`

if [[ -z "$TOF" ]]
then
  echo "vlc somemusicfile.mp3"
fi

also you can change your script to return 0 on success and return 1 on fail:

$ cat myscript
#!/bin/bash

if [[ -s somemusicfile.mp3 ]]
then
  return 0
else
  echo "File does not contain music" 
  return 1
fi

and check this way:

#!/bin/bash

if myscript
then
  echo "vlc somemusicfile.mp3"
fi
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