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I've been using the following command to grep for a string in all the python source files in and below my current directory:

find . -name '*.py' -exec grep -nHr <string> {} \;

I'd like to simplify things so that I can just type something like

findpy <string>

And get the exact same result. Aliases don't seem sufficient since they only do a string expansion, and the argument I need to specify is not the last argument. It sounds like functions are suitable for the task, so I have several questions:

  • How do I write it?
  • Where do I put it?
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9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you don't want to create an entire script for this, you can do it with just a shell function:

findpy() { find . -name '*.py' -exec grep -nHr "$1" {} \; ; }

...but then you may have to define it in both ~/.bashrc and ~/.bash_profile, so it gets defined for both login and interactive shells (see the INVOCATION section of bash's man page).

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My distribution has it set up that the only action that .bash_profile takes is to source .bashrc, so it's a non-issue. Thanks! –  saffsd May 29 '09 at 5:52
1  
functions and aliasses should go in ~/.bashrc and ~/.bash_profile or ~/.profile should source ~/.bashrc –  lhunath May 29 '09 at 5:52
    
Yah, sourcing one from the other makes life much easier. For safety, I have my .bash_profile check first, like this: if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then . ~/.bashrc; fi –  Gordon Davisson May 29 '09 at 7:15
    
tip: add --color –  Rose Perrone Mar 14 '13 at 14:47
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All the "find ... -exec" solutions above are OK in the sense that they work, but they are horribly inefficient and will be extremely slow for large trees. The reason is that they launch a new process for every single *.py file. Instead, use xargs(1), and run grep only on files (not directories):

#! /bin/sh
find . -name \*.py -type f | xargs grep -nHr "$1"

For example:

$ time sh -c 'find . -name \*.cpp -type f -exec grep foo {} \; >/dev/null'
real    0m3.747s
$ time sh -c 'find . -name \*.cpp -type f | xargs grep foo >/dev/null'
real    0m0.278s
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How does time sh -c 'find . -name *.cpp -type f -exec grep foo {} + >/dev/null' compare? For me it was a little faster than xargs, but xargs gave me some "no such file or directory errors" on a few Python files with spaces in their names (thanks cmu). The -exec versions didn't complain. –  Dennis Williamson May 29 '09 at 6:59
    
Using "-exec ... +" should be equivalent to xargs in terms of performance, but it's not portable and not as flexible as xargs. Spaces in file names can be easily handled by passing -print0 to find and -0 to args, so file names are delimited by NUL characters instead of blanks, i.e. "find -name *.cpp -print0 | xargs -0 grep foo'. –  Idelic May 29 '09 at 8:07
    
Actually, I just checked that "-exec ... +" is in POSIX, hence it can be considered portable. That leaves just flexibility as argument for xargs :-) –  Idelic May 29 '09 at 8:14
    
I found out some problems with exotic file names (that contained ':' characters). Change it to the following: find . -type f -name *.py -print0|xargs --null grep -nHr "$1" –  Roalt Sep 10 '09 at 14:26
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On a side note, you should take a look at Ack for what you are doing. It is designed as a replacement for Grep written in Perl. Filtering files based on the target language or ignoring .svn directories and the like.

Example (snippet from Trac source):

$ ack --python foo ./mysource
ticket/tests/wikisyntax.py
139:milestone:foo
144:<a class="missing milestone" href="/milestone/foo" rel="nofollow">milestone:foo</a>

ticket/tests/conversion.py
34:        ticket['foo'] = 'This is a custom field'

ticket/query.py
239:        count_sql = 'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (' + sql + ') AS foo'
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I wanted something similar, and the answer by Idelic reminded of one of the nice features of xargs: that it puts the command at the end. You see, my problem was that I wanted to write a shell alias that would "accept parameters" (really, that it would expand in such a way to allow me to pass parameter so grep).

Here's what I added to my bash_aliases:

alias findpy="find . -type f -name '*.py' | xargs grep"

This way, I could write findpy WORD or findpy -e REGEX or findpy -il WORD - the point being that could use any grep command-line option.

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Put the following three lines in a file named findpy

#!/bin/bash

find . -name '*.py' -exec grep -nHr $1 {} \;

Then say

chmod u+x findpy

I normally have a directory called bin in my home directory where I put little shell scripts like this. Make sure to add the directory to your PATH.

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The script:

#!/bin/bash
find . -name '*.py' -exec grep -nHr "$1" {} ';'

is how I'd do it.

You write it with an editor like vim and put it somewhere on your path. My normal approach is to have a ~/bin directory and make sure my .profile file (or equivalent) contains:

PATH=$PATH:~/bin
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I don't think you need the -r on your grep there ;-) –  lhunath May 29 '09 at 5:51
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Many versions of grep have options to do recursion, specify filename pattern, etc.

grep --perl-regexp --recursive --include='*.py' --regexp="$1" .

This recurses starting from the current directory (.), looks only at files ending in 'py', uses Perl-style regular expressions.

If your version of grep doesn't support --recursive and --include, then you can still use find and xargs, but be sure to allow for pathnames with embedded spaces by using the -print0 argument to find and the --null option to xargs to handle that.

find . -type f -name '*.py' -print0 | xargs --null grep "$1"

should work.

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On my system, find is faster than grep --recursive. Also, grep --recursive returns "recursive directory loop" errors under some circumstances when find doesn't. –  Dennis Williamson May 30 '09 at 18:17
    
Interesting! I've never gotten the "recursive directory loop" as I usually run on a Windows box which doesn't have real symbolic links. I assume that is how you got that error? –  Harold Bamford Jun 8 '09 at 22:27
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Add the following line to your ~/.bashrc or ~/.bash_profile or ~/.profile

alias findpy='find . -type f -name "*.py" -print0 | xargs -0 grep'

then you can use it like this

findpy def

or with grep options

findpy -i class

the following alias will ignore the version control meta-directory of git and svn

alias findpy='find . -type f -not -path "*/.git/*" -a -not -path "*/.svn/*" -name "*.py" -print0 | xargs -0 grep'
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#######################################################################################
#
# Function to search all files (including sub-directories) that match a given file
# extension ($2) looking for an indicated string ($1) - in a case insensitive manner.
#
# For Example:
#
# -> findfile AllowNegativePayments cpp
#
#
#######################################################################################
findfile ()
{
    find . -iname "*.$2*" -type f -print0 | xargs -0 grep -i "$1" {} \; 2> /dev/nul
}

alias _ff='findfile'
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