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I am having the following problem in Java (I see some people are having a similar problem in JavaScript but I'm using Java...)

System.out.println(new Date().getYear());
System.out.println(new GregorianCalendar().getTime().getYear());
System.out.println(this.sale.getSaleDate().getYear());
System.out.println(this.sale.getSaleDate().getMonth());
System.out.println(this.sale.getSaleDate().getDate());

returns

I/System.out( 4274): 112
I/System.out( 4274): 112
I/System.out( 4274): 112
I/System.out( 4274): 1
I/System.out( 4274): 11

I don't understnad the 112 bit which I thought would have been 2012. I thought Y2K bugs were fixed long time ago. What's going on? Is the java.util.Date class unusable (I am storing this as a field in several of my classes to store a date and time). What should I do?

Thanks,

John Goche

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

According to javadocs:

getYear

@Deprecated public int getYear() Deprecated. As of JDK version 1.1, replaced by Calendar.get(Calendar.YEAR) - 1900. Returns a value that is the result of subtracting 1900 from the year that contains or begins with the instant in time represented by this Date object, as interpreted in the local time zone. Returns: the year represented by this date, minus 1900. See Also: Calendar

So 112 is the correct output. I would follow the advice in the Javadoc or use JodaTime instead.

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2  
+1 for JodaTime –  dnault Feb 11 '12 at 22:40
1  
the correct implementation of a totally bizaare spec! –  Jonny Leeds May 12 at 15:40

Use date format

SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss");
Date date = format.parse(datetime);
SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy");
year = df.format(date);
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Don't use Date, use Calendar:

// Beware: months are zero-based and no out of range errors are reported
Calendar date = new GregorianCalendar(2012, 9, 5);
int year = date.get(Calendar.YEAR);  // 2012
int month = date.get(Calendar.MONTH);  // 9 - October!!!
int day = date.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);  // 5

It supports time as well:

Calendar dateTime = new GregorianCalendar(2012, 3, 4, 15, 16, 17);
int hour = dateTime.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY);  // 15
int minute = dateTime.get(Calendar.MINUTE);  // 16
int second = dateTime.get(Calendar.SECOND);  // 17
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Yup, this is in fact what's happening. See also the Javadoc:

Returns:
   the year represented by this date, minus 1900.

The getYear method is deprecated for this reason. So, don't use it.

Note also that getMonth returns a number between 0 and 11. Therefore, this.sale.getSaleDate().getMonth() returns 1 for February, instead of 2. While java.util.Calendar doesn't add 1900 to all years, it does suffer from the off-by-one-month problem.

You're much better off using JodaTime.

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This behavior is documented in the java.util.Date -class documentation:

Returns a value that is the result of subtracting 1900 from the year that contains or begins with the instant in time represented by this Date object, as interpreted in the local time zone.

It is also marked as deprecated. Use java.util.Calendar instead.

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