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I have a "main" object called Application, which will store all my functions relevant to this particular script. There some various functions in that object, for example, start() and pause(), which interacts with a child-object.

When calling these functions from a child-object (of the Application object, or even deeper), I have to refer to the Application.function() directly. Which can get very clutty. It's the same case within these functions if I would need to interact with child data, this.Game.instance.sessionId. It's made to fail, what if I add even more objects in the future as my need grows? It will get very confusing, not to mention lengthy, just to interact with another child/parent object.

Example code:

    var Application = {     
       //Start the whole application
       start: function() {
          doSomething(this.Game.instance) //do something with the game instance object
       },

       pause: function() {
          //pause the current sessionId
          interactWithMyServer(this.Game.instance.sessionId); //clutty
       }

       Game: {  
          //redraw the game to reflect changes
          redraw: function() {
             someDrawFunction(this.instance); //draw the instance
          },

          //Stores information about the game instance from the server, changes often
          //bad example with the pause, but just to get the idea of my example
          instance: {
             gameId: 23,
             sessionId: 32,
             map: 32,

             //dummy function
             pause: function() {
             Application.pause(); //works, but I have to start with the "root" object, Application - how to avoid this?
             }
          }

      }             
   };

Excuse the stupid code, was just trying to show my problem.

How to structure this, or rather rebuild, in the most proper and clean way?

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2 Answers 2

There's no inherent permanent relationship between objects that happen to be defined in ways like you describe. In other words, the object defined for the property "Game" is not intrinsically related to the "Application" object, and neither is "instance" related to "Game". If you wanted it to be, you'd have to explicitly give it a property that relates it.

  var Application = {
    // ...
    Game: {
      //redraw the game to reflect changes
      redraw: function() {
         someDrawFunction(this.instance); //draw the instance
      },

      //Stores information about the game instance from the server, changes often
      //bad example with the pause, but just to get the idea of my example
      instance: {
         gameId: 23,
         sessionId: 32,
         map: 32,
         app: null,

         //dummy function
         pause: function() {
           this.app.pause(); //works, but I have to start with the "root" object, Application - how to avoid this?
         }
      }

// ...

Application.Game.instance.app = Application;
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You can pass reference to parent by defining some closure method:

var App= {


    aplicationFunction: function() {
        alert("Hello, yes this is application...");
    },

    app: this,

    getGameObj: function() {
        var _that = this;
        return {

            that: _that,

            parentF: function() {
                this.that.aplicationFunction();
            },
        };
    },
};

App.getGameObj().parentF();

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/vZDr2/

For more comfort you could use it as following example:

gameobj = App.getGameObj();
gameobj.parentF();
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