Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a script that prints in a loop. I want the loop to print differently the first time from all other times (i.e., it should print differently if anything has been printed at all). I am thinking a simple way would be to check whether anything has been printed yet (i.e., stdout has been written to). Is there any way to determine that?

I know I could also write to a variable and test whether it's empty, but I'd like to avoid a variable if I can.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to avoid a variable? It will make your code more readable and maintainable. What's the perceived cost? –  Johnsyweb Feb 11 '12 at 21:42
    
Why not just test a loop counter? I know you say I'd like to avoid a variable, but why? The redirect to a tmpfile is a fine solution, but you are adding a whole lot more than a variable there... A simple declare -i cnt; while [your loop]; do #stuff; if [ cnt -eq 0 ]; then printf "a"; else printf "b"; fi; ((cnt++)); done is a lot shorter and avoids the tmpfile which adds IO time and overhead. –  David C. Rankin Mar 19 at 21:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think that will do what you need. If you echo something between # THE SCRIPT ITSELF and # END, THE FOLLOWING DATA HAS BEEN WRITTEN TO STDOUT will be printed STDOUT HAS NOT BEEN TOUCHED else...

#!/bin/bash

readonly TMP=$(mktemp /tmp/test_XXXXXX)

exec 3<> "$TMP"   # open tmp file as fd 3
exec 4>&1         # save current value of stdout as fd 4
exec >&3          # redirect stdout to fd 3 (tmp file)

# THE SCRIPT ITSELF

echo Hello World

# END

exec >&4          # restore save stdout
exec 3>&-         # close tmp file

TMP_SIZE=$(stat -f %z "$TMP")
if [ $TMP_SIZE -gt 0 ]; then
    echo "THE FOLLOWING DATA HAS BEEN WRITTEN TO STDOUT"
    echo
    cat "$TMP"
else
    echo "STDOUT HAS NOT BEEN TOUCHED"
fi

rm "$TMP"

So, output of the script as is:


THE FOLLOWING DATA HAS BEEN WRITTEN TO STDOUT

Hello World

and if you remove the echo Hello World line:

STDOUT HAS NOT BEEN TOUCHED

And if you really want to test that while running the script itself, you can do that, too :-)

#!/bin/bash

#FIRST ELSE
function echo_fl() {
    TMP_SIZE=$(stat -f %z "$TMP")
    if [ $TMP_SIZE -gt 0 ]; then
        echo $2
    else
        echo $1
    fi  
}

TMP=$(mktemp /tmp/test_XXXXXX)

exec 3 "$TMP"   # open tmp file as fd 3
exec 4>&1         # save current value of stdout as fd 4
exec >&3          # redirect stdout to fd 3 (tmp file)

# THE SCRIPT ITSELF

for f in fst snd trd; do
    echo_fl "$(echo $f | tr a-z A-Z)" "$f"
done

# END

exec >&4          # restore save stdout
exec 3>&-         # close tmp file

TMP_SIZE=$(stat -f %z "$TMP")
if [ $TMP_SIZE -gt 0 ]; then
    echo "THE FOLLOWING DATA HAS BEEN WRITTEN TO STDOUT"
    echo
    cat "$TMP"
else
    echo "STDOUT HAS NOT BEEN TOUCHED"
fi

rm "$TMP"

output is:

THE FOLLOWING DATA HAS BEEN WRITTEN TO STDOUT

FST
snd
trd

as you can see: Only the first line (FST) has caps on. That's what the echo_fl function does for you: If it's the first line of output, if echoes the first argument, if it's not it echoes the second argument :-)

share|improve this answer
    
This still creates TMP as a variable but it is pretty cool .. I may be able to get around it, though. I think using a variable for what I'm trying to do is much easier. –  Explosion Pills Feb 11 '12 at 21:18
    
yeah, it still creates variable TMP, but it also works if the output is done by some other program. Say if you put a cat /etc/fstab before the for f in fst snd trd... loop, fst will be printed with caps off! What's the problem with the variables? –  Johannes Weiß Feb 11 '12 at 21:21
    
By the way: TMP is more a constant than a variable. I marked it (edit) as readonly now. –  Johannes Weiß Feb 11 '12 at 21:23

It's hard to tell what you are trying to do here, but if your script is printing to stdout, you could simply pipe it to perl:

yourcommand | perl -pe 'if ($. == 1) { print "First line is: $_" }'

It all depends on what kind of changes you are attempting to do.

share|improve this answer

You cannot use the -f option with %z. The line TMP_SIZE=$(stat -f %z "$TMP") produces a long string that fails the test in if [ $TMP_SIZE -gt 0 ].

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.