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Can anyone tell me how to get file name without the extension? Example:

fileNameWithExt = test.xml;
fileNameWithOutExt = test;
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6 Answers 6

up vote 167 down vote accepted

If you like me rather use some library code where they probably have thought of all special cases, such what if you pass in null or dots in the path but not in the filename, you can use the following:

import org.apache.commons.io.FilenameUtils;
String fileNameWithOutExt = FilenameUtils.removeExtension(fileNameWithExt);
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31  
+1 for not reinventing the wheel –  skaffman Nov 27 '09 at 10:32
14  
you can also use FilenameUtils.getBasename to go straight from a path string to a filename-without-extension. –  Ian Durkan Jan 28 '11 at 16:37
1  
The easiest is of course running maven :-) Otherwise see: commons.apache.org/io –  Ulf Lindback Jan 2 '13 at 13:48
3  
Good coders code, great coders reuse! –  Chander Shivdasani Mar 5 '13 at 1:36
4  
For those who prefer Guava, it can do this too. (These days I don't personally feel very good about adding Apache Commons dependencies, though historically those libraries have been very useful.) –  Jonik Apr 10 '13 at 10:48

If your project uses Guava (14.0 or newer), you can go with Files.getNameWithoutExtension().

(Essentially the same as FilenameUtils.removeExtension() from Apache Commons IO, as the highest-voted answer suggests. Just wanted to point out Guava does this too. Personally I didn't want to add dependency to Commons—which I feel is a bit of a relic—just because of this.)

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Try the code below. Using core Java basic functions. It takes care of Strings with extension, and without extension (without the '.' character). The case of multiple '.' is also covered.

String str = "filename.xml";
if (!str.contains(".")) 
    System.out.println("File Name=" + str); 
else {
    str = str.substring(0, str.lastIndexOf("."));
    // Because extension is always after the last '.'
    System.out.println("File Name=" + str);
}

You can adapt it to work with null strings.

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It's pretty bad practise to implement this kind of functionality yourself. On the first glance the task seems to be extremely obvious, but in practise you will face a lot of exceptional situations (like there is no . in file name, or file is a backup and has name like document.docx.backup, etc). It's much more reliable to use external library which deals with all this exceptional situations for you. –  Kite Jun 6 at 9:29
    
On the other hand adding to many libraries to your project will make it larger. So simple things like this could be done by yourself. –  Nicolas Tyler Nov 25 at 8:48

While I am a big believer in reusing libraries, the org.apache.commons.io JAR is 174KB, which is noticably large for a mobile app.

If you download the source code and take a look at their FilenameUtils class, you can see there are a lot of extra utilities, and it does cope with Windows and Unix paths, which is all lovely.

However, if you just want a couple of static utility methods for use with Unix style paths (with a "/" separator), you may find the code below useful.

The removeExtension method preserves the rest of the path along with the filename. There is also a similar getExtension.

/**
 * Remove the file extension from a filename, that may include a path.
 * 
 * e.g. /path/to/myfile.jpg -> /path/to/myfile 
 */
public static String removeExtension(String filename) {
    if (filename == null) {
        return null;
    }

    int index = indexOfExtension(filename);

    if (index == -1) {
        return filename;
    } else {
        return filename.substring(0, index);
    }
}

/**
 * Return the file extension from a filename, including the "."
 * 
 * e.g. /path/to/myfile.jpg -> .jpg
 */
public static String getExtension(String filename) {
    if (filename == null) {
        return null;
    }

    int index = indexOfExtension(filename);

    if (index == -1) {
        return filename;
    } else {
        return filename.substring(index);
    }
}

private static final char EXTENSION_SEPARATOR = '.';
private static final char DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR = '/';

public static int indexOfExtension(String filename) {

    if (filename == null) {
        return -1;
    }

    // Check that no directory separator appears after the 
    // EXTENSION_SEPARATOR
    int extensionPos = filename.lastIndexOf(EXTENSION_SEPARATOR);

    int lastDirSeparator = filename.lastIndexOf(DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR);

    if (lastDirSeparator > extensionPos) {
        LogIt.w(FileSystemUtil.class, "A directory separator appears after the file extension, assuming there is no file extension");
        return -1;
    }

    return extensionPos;
}
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See the following test program:

public class javatemp {
    static String stripExtension (String str) {
        // Handle null case specially.

        if (str == null) return null;

        // Get position of last '.'.

        int pos = str.lastIndexOf(".");

        // If there wasn't any '.' just return the string as is.

        if (pos == -1) return str;

        // Otherwise return the string, up to the dot.

        return str.substring(0, pos);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println ("test.xml   -> " + stripExtension ("test.xml"));
        System.out.println ("test.2.xml -> " + stripExtension ("test.2.xml"));
        System.out.println ("test       -> " + stripExtension ("test"));
        System.out.println ("test.      -> " + stripExtension ("test."));
    }
}

which outputs:

test.xml   -> test
test.2.xml -> test.2
test       -> test
test.      -> test
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You forgot the null test: System.out.println ("null -> " + stripExtension (null)); –  Ulf Lindback Nov 27 '09 at 10:15
    
As you wish :-) –  paxdiablo Nov 27 '09 at 10:23
3  
@tchrist, foo.tar.gz is a gzipped version of foo.tar so you could also argue that gz was the extension. It all comes down to how you define the extension. –  paxdiablo Aug 30 '11 at 7:38
2  
what to do with files like .gitignore? –  michael nesterenko Jul 25 '12 at 19:28
2  
If that were a rule, the language would enforce it. Since it doesn't, it's a guideline however strongly it's suggested. In any case, that's totally irrelevant to the question and answer. –  paxdiablo Nov 29 '13 at 8:23

The easiest way is to use a regular expression.

fileNameWithOutExt = "test.xml".replaceFirst("[.][^.]+$", "");

The above expression will remove the last dot followed by one or more characters. Here's a basic unit test.

public void testRegex() {
	assertEquals("test", "test.xml".replaceFirst("[.][^.]+$", ""));
	assertEquals("test.2", "test.2.xml".replaceFirst("[.][^.]+$", ""));
}
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thanks dude, it works :) –  Iso Jun 3 '09 at 0:27
3  
Regex is not as easy to use as the library solution above. It works, but looking at the code (without having to interpret the REGEX) isn't obvious what it does. –  Gustavo Litovsky Nov 28 '12 at 21:12
1  
@GustavoLitovsky Android doesn't come bundled with org.apache.commons. As far as I'm aware, this is the only way to do it in Android. –  Liam George Betsworth Jun 6 at 8:56

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