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I am having a bit of problem understanding with how arrays they handle their memory. I am pretty bad at explaining in words, so I'll write you some code :)

string[] arr1 = new string[10];
string[] arr2 = new string[10];

/* Fill 'arr1' with random strings */

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
        arr2[i] = arr1[i]
} 

Does this take 2x (size of strings in arr1 and arr2) of memory?

Initially the answer seemed pretty obvious "no" to me, but then I remember that array, with all of its elements, are stored in big continious chunk of memory for fast indexing, so at the moment I have no idea :)

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

The first array contains ten references to strings, so it needs memory to keep them. The same applies to the second array.

But the strings are stored separately. And if you copy the strings from one array to the other, no additional memory is allocated.

So, in your case, the total memory consumed is (ignoring overhead):

  • 10 times the size of reference for arr1
  • 10 times the size of reference for arr2
  • the memory required for the 10 strings, once
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Yes it will take double the memory compared to having a single array, the array object instances and the memory they occupy are completely separate.

Since string is a reference type, each array will store 10 string references. References are similar to a pointer in that they just contain a description (the "reference") where to find the actual object instance in memory (e.g. a memory adress).

That means that arr1 and arr2 have references that actually point to the same 10 string instances in your example (since you just copy the references).

For arrays that contain value types on the other hand (e.g. any primitive type or struct) the array occupies the full continuous memory space needed for all items in the array in one big block - each value type needs as much space as the fields it contains.

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1  
Deleted the previous comment. I'm sorry but I can't +1 this- it is just too misleading given the OP's obvious ignorance of the diff between references and instances. – Chris Shain Feb 11 '12 at 21:16
2  
I think this is very misleading. If I have an array with 10 strings and each string has 1 MB, then that will consume ~10MB. If I have another array that contains the same strings, it will not consume another ~10MB, so it will not “take double the memory compared to having a single array”. – svick Feb 11 '12 at 21:19
    
@Chris I'm sorry, unfortunately I did not ( completely ) understand the difference between references and instances before :) By the way, how much memory does reference to object/instance take? – Jaakko Lipsanen Feb 11 '12 at 21:23
1  
@JaakkoLipsanen: a reference uses 32 bits on a 32 bit OS, 64 bits on a 64 bit OS. – BrokenGlass Feb 11 '12 at 21:27
1  
That's not that much at all: it's the same as a single int or long value respectively – BrokenGlass Feb 11 '12 at 21:29

You have allocated 2 arrays, so each one will take it own space in memory. therefore, answer to your question is yes.

But, you also have to consider what is being allocated twice here. string is a reference type, so by executing arr2[i] = arr1[i] code, you are merely copying a reference to the string. As a result, you have 20 references in total, but to 10 different strings, which are allocated once.

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That depends on what's in the array. Arrays of reference types in .NET are actually arrays of references (pointers), so the array itself does not contain the strings. Strings in .NET are reference types, so your example is particularly good for explaining this.

Take this for example:

string[] arr1 = new string[] { "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J" };
string[] arr2 = new string[10];

/* Fill 'arr1' with random strings */

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    arr2[i] = arr1[i]
} 

The variable arr2 will take an additional 10 references worth of memory + a little overhead, but it will not store new copies of all of the strings. On the other hand, this will create new strings using the Copy method and so will take significantly more memory:

string[] arr1 = new string[] { "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J" };
string[] arr2 = new string[10];

/* Fill 'arr1' with random strings */

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    arr2[i] = arr1[i].Copy();
} 
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1  
string.Copy() is a static method, you can't call it like an instance method. – svick Feb 11 '12 at 21:22

You will need the space to store the references in the two arrays, and the space to store the objects those references refer to. In your example, there's only one copy for each of the strings, but two copies of the references (memory address pointers) to each. The strings could be very large, but the (duplicated) references will be much smaller.

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