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UPDATE: Sorry I was wrong with my assumption of the problem. Its due to me trying to make the function parallel and have multiple proceses change the same dictionary. How can I design my function so it allows for this? If I have to send the dictionary(in this case) then it'll keep overwriting itself and can't span over all the cores. I'm happy to redesign the function but not sure how i can do it and still spread it over multiple cores.

To simplify, I basically have something like the following:

list = [1,2,3,10]
dictionary = {}
for x in list:
    for xx in range(100):
        for xxx in range(100):
            dictionary[x]=xx*xxx

This works, but when I wrap the for loop in a function, I get: NameError: global name 'dictionary' is not defined

def test(x):
        for xx in range(100):
            for xxx in range(100):
                dictionary[x]=xx*xxx

I know this has something to do with the namespace but I don't want to send variables to the function in this case because I think it'll overwrite the variable dictionary. How can I reference the dictionary variable while in the function? The reason I ask is I want to create a process that spans multiple cpu's, so I don't want to declare the variables in each function.

I'm using functions but if I need to use classes or there's another way to get around this then please me know and I'll rethink my approach.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try again:

lst = [1,2,3,10]
dictionary = {}
def test(x):
    for xx in range(100):
        for xxx in range(100):
            dictionary[x]=xx*xxx

for x in lst:
    test(x) 

You only get a NameError when a name is not defined. It has nothing to do with scopes.

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ahh your right..I tried it on its own and it worked. I was trying to take a proces I had and wrap it into the above function so I can use the pp module to have multiple cpus work on it. Seems to happen when I'm creating jobs using it. –  Lostsoul Feb 12 '12 at 2:32
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How can I reference a outside variable from within a function?

Don't. Pass it as a parameter.

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but i want to avoid having to pass a ton of reference variables –  Lostsoul Feb 12 '12 at 2:38
1  
Why exactly are you expecting to need "a ton" of them? Maybe your function needs redesign. –  Karl Knechtel Feb 12 '12 at 2:40
    
For example, say I have a function and a counter to count the number of times its successful. If I distributed the job over multiple cpus, then sending it to each function would restart the counter each time a new process is created. –  Lostsoul Feb 12 '12 at 2:43
1  
@Lostsoul: then put your data into a dict and pass that in, then unpack them inside your function. References to global variables are generally a bad thing. –  cjrh Feb 12 '12 at 2:49
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Try to avoid global variables and pass the variables needed into the function:

>>> def test(x, dictionary):
...     for xx in range(100):
...         for xxx in range(100):
...             dictionary[x] = xx * xxx
... 
>>> list_of_numbers = [1, 2, 3, 10]
>>> dictionary = {}
>>> 
>>> for x in list_of_numbers:
...     test(x, dictionary)
... 
>>> print dictionary
{1: 9801, 2: 9801, 3: 9801, 10: 9801}

I've renamed list, since it is a Python built-in.

This can clearly be simplified to:

>>> for x in list_of_numbers:
...     dictionary[x] = 99 * 99
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