Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to make a new array in my project

the code is:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
void makeArray( int *& arrayPtr, int size );
int main( )
{
  int * arrPtr;
  int size =10;
  makeArray( arrPtr, size );
  for(int j=0;j<size;j++)
  {
    cout<<arrPtr[j]<<endl;
  }
}
void makeArray( int *& arrayPtr, int size )
{
  int arr[size-1];
  for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
  {
    arr[i]=0;
  }

  *&arrayPtr=*&arr;
}

According to the requirements i need to use the above "makeArray" method inorder to make the array. When i run the code the output is garbage values not zero.....

any help will be appreciated

thank you

share|improve this question
1  
This even compiles? Are you using GCC? –  Mysticial Feb 12 '12 at 2:55
    
I think the last line is a bit awkward: having *& is the same as removing it, i.e. the line would be equal to *&arrayPtr=arr; –  Michel Keijzers Feb 12 '12 at 2:56
1  
So why are you doing this when there's a perfectly good std::vector class? Is this schoolwork? –  Ben Voigt Feb 12 '12 at 2:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The way you are creating the array is on the stack, which means that it will not exist after the makeArray function finishes.

You will need to allocate the array on the heap.

So:

int arr[size-1];

should be:

int *arr = new int[size-1];

Also, I think you mean to do this in makeArray():

arrayPtr = arr;

Instead of:

*&arrayPtr=*&arr;

Which compiles but is more complex and is functionally the same thing in this context.

But you may prefer just returning an int* instead of taking a reference to the pointer.

Then when you are done using the array in main(), and set it to NULL just in case you accidentally use it again, like this:

for(int j=0;j<size;j++)
{
  cout<<arrPtr[j]<<endl;
}
delete [] arrPtr;
arrPtr = NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
new[] returns a pointer, not an int. –  Ben Voigt Feb 12 '12 at 2:57
    
Typo, thanks for catching –  Michael Chinen Feb 12 '12 at 2:59
    
You might like to highlight where you'd delete[] this to avoid memory leaks. –  Johnsyweb Feb 12 '12 at 3:01
    
Yes, good call. –  Michael Chinen Feb 12 '12 at 3:02
    
thank you that did the job.... –  Baba Feb 12 '12 at 3:04

Why are you declaring a parameter as 'int *& arrayPtr'? Do you just need a pointer to an array? You should use 'int *arrayPtr' instead.

To answer your question, the problem is that you are declaring an array in the function makeArray's stack. Upon the completion of a function, that function's stack is destroyed, so you're passing the address of junk data. To avoid this, use dynamic memory allocation instead.

EDIT: Also, you should use memset instead of a for loop to zero an array. It's much faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Because he's reseating the pointer, he does need to pass it by reference. –  Ben Voigt Feb 12 '12 at 2:59
    
Oh, ok. My C++-fu is a little rusty. –  pg1989 Feb 12 '12 at 3:02

The "arr" which you allocate in "makeArray()" is local. and when the functione is over the array is release. When you back to main you get garbage. What you want to do, is to use the "new" operator to allocate this new array to be used in all program, unless you will free this memory by "delete". so you can set your makeArray() to:

int* makeArray(int size )
{
  int *arr = new[size];
  for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
  {
    arr[i]=0;
  }

  return arr;
}

the in you main you need to initialize your arry by:

int * arrPtr = makeArray(10);

just don't forget to release this memory after you finsh:

delete[] arrPtr ;

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.