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my stylesheets tend to have a lot of redundancy. for example,

/* example one: different attributes */
div#main_work > div.main_work table.data td span.rating,
div#main_work > div.main_work table.data td span.follow 
   { white-space: nowrap; vertical-align: center; }

/* example two: same upstream, different downstream */
div#main_work > div.main_work > form table,
div#main_work > div.main_work > table,
div#main_work > div.main_work div table
   { width: 100%; margin: 0px;  -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; }

is there a syntactically correct way to collapse this?

share|improve this question
    
Kind of redundant question. It's like saying you've got a bag of marbles and asking the probability of picking a green one, how are we to know unless we know what colour / how many marbles you have? CSS can only be simplified on a case-by-case basis depending on your HTML, which makes the question excessively localised, or in this case impossible without seeing your HTML. That said it seems elclanrs has given the most logical simplification... –  lpd Feb 12 '12 at 4:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, that's just how it is. You could alleviate some troubles by being less specific about things, especially in ID selectors:

/* example one: different attributes */
#main_work > .main_work .data .rating,
#main_work > .main_work .data .follow 
   { white-space: nowrap; vertical-align: center; }

/* example two: same upstream, different downstream */
#main_work > .main_work > form table,
#main_work > .main_work > table,
#main_work > .main_work div table
   { width: 100%; margin: 0px;  -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; }

And you can probably reduce this further. Try to be concise and obvious about the intent. As another alternative, you might try LESS stylesheets.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your reply. as you might imagine, have gotten severely bit by underspecifying -don't want to go there again - way too long to dig out from that mess. yes, less is a valid option for some. –  cc young Feb 12 '12 at 4:20
1  
@ccyoung: Overspecifying is much worse. Trust me and just simplify your expressions. If you won't do that, the least you can do is remove div from div#main_work. It's completely redundant and hinders performance. –  minitech Feb 12 '12 at 4:22
    
agree on removing div from div#main - that was overboard for sure. but I am interested in why you content over-specifying is much worse. from my perspective, paying attention to over-specifying falls in the class of premature optimization. –  cc young Feb 12 '12 at 4:33
    
You should not run into under-specifying if you think about your selectors first. –  elclanrs Feb 12 '12 at 4:33
    
If you're still unsure, just run this test jsperf.com/over-specifying-test. It's testing over-specifying in jQuery, but expect similar results in css. –  elclanrs Feb 12 '12 at 4:43

Well, I don't know your html code, but you can probably get rid of a few things and target the actual elements needed and avoid over-specification. Just an example, fit to your needs, but you get the idea:

/* example one: different attributes */
.main_work .rating,
.main_work .follow 
   { white-space: nowrap; vertical-align: center; }

/* example two: same upstream, different downstream */
.main_work table,
.main_work form table,
.main_work div table
   { width: 100%; margin: 0px;  -moz-box-sizing: border-box; box-sizing: border-box; }
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but from my perspective over-specification is a venal sin of adding unnecessary bytes to the tubes, whereas under-specification is a mortal sin that dooms one to the purgatory of debugging css for two or three lifetimes. (apologies to good Catholics) –  cc young Feb 12 '12 at 4:22

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