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I made a simple program that allows the user to pick a number of dice then guess the outcome... I posted this code before but with the wrong question so it was deleted... now I cannot have any errors or even warnings on this code but for some reason this warning keeps popping and I have no clue how to fix it... "warning C4244: 'argument' : conversion from 'time_t' to 'unsigned int', possible loss of data"

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <time.h>

using namespace std;

int  choice, dice, random;

int main(){
    string decision;
    srand ( time(NULL) );
    while(decision != "no" || decision != "No")
    {
        std::cout << "how many dice would you like to use? ";
        std::cin >> dice;
        std::cout << "guess what number was thrown: ";
        std::cin >> choice;
         for(int i=0; i<dice;i++){
            random = rand() % 6 + 1;
         }
        if( choice == random){
            std::cout << "Congratulations, you got it right! \n";
            std::cout << "Want to try again?(Yes/No) ";
            std::cin >> decision;
        } else{
            std::cout << "Sorry, the number was " << random << "... better luck next  time \n" ;
            std::cout << "Want to try again?(Yes/No) ";
            std::cin >> decision;
        }

    }
    std::cout << "Press ENTER to continue...";
    std::cin.ignore( std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n' );
    return 0;
}

This is what I am trying to figure out, why am I getting this warning: warning C4244: 'argument' : conversion from 'time_t' to 'unsigned int', possible loss of data

share|improve this question
    
The time_t might be a 64-bit type, while int is 32 bits. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 12 '12 at 5:00
3  
And, please, for the love of whatever gods you believe in, choose C or C++ and stick with it. Including cstdlib and time.h makes me want to come over and slap you around :-) –  paxdiablo Feb 12 '12 at 5:08
    
LOL! Paxidiablo I would LOVE to stick with C++ but this class requires me to start with C/C++ then migrate more into C++ and ditch the C as much as possible –  Gal Appelbaum Feb 12 '12 at 5:14
1  
No it does not. You can include ctime instead of time.h. –  aib Feb 12 '12 at 5:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 28 down vote accepted

That's because on your system, time_t is a larger integer type than unsigned int.

  • time() returns a time_t which is probably a 64-bit integer.
  • srand() wants an unsigned int which is probably a 32-bit integer.

Hence you get the warning. You can silence it with a cast:

srand ( (unsigned int)time(NULL) );

In this case, the downcast (and potential data loss) doesn't matter since you're only using it to seed the RNG.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 this is only correct answer in its entirety (and wordings). –  Nawaz Feb 12 '12 at 5:16
1  
Ugh, C-style casts don't belong in C++ programs. –  aib Feb 12 '12 at 5:31
    
@aib They are shorter. And they are fine for numerical casts. –  Mysticial Feb 12 '12 at 5:35
    
Worked it like a charm for me. And I guess you could use size_t instead of unsigned int, isn't it? Thanks! –  Fabiano Feb 6 '13 at 16:11
1  
@Fabiano You could. But bare in mind that srand() takes unsigned int as a parameter. If unsigned int and size_t happen to be different sizes on your machine (as is usually the case on x64), then you will get a similar warning about potential loss of data. So it's better to stick with just unsigned int. –  Mysticial Feb 6 '13 at 17:41

This line involves an implicit cast from time_t which time returns to unsigned int which srand takes:

srand ( time(NULL) );

You can make it an explicit cast instead:

srand ( static_cast<unsigned int>(time(NULL)) );
share|improve this answer

time() returns a time_t, which can be 32 or 64 bits. srand() takes an unsigned int, which is 32 bits. To be fair, you probably won't care since it's only being used as a seed for randomization.

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3  
They are not guaranteed to be 32/64 bits. –  Pubby Feb 12 '12 at 5:04

This line involves an implicit cast from time_t which time returns to unsigned int which srand takes:

srand ( time(NULL) );

You can make it an explicit cast instead:

srand ( static_cast<unsigned int>(time(NULL)) );
share|improve this answer

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